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Semiotext(e)

Best known for its introduction of French theory to American readers, Semiotext(e) has been one of America's most influential independent presses since its inception more than three decades ago. Publishing works of theory, fiction, madness, economics, satire, sexuality, science fiction, activism and confession, Semiotext(e')s highly curated list has famously melded high and low forms of cultural expression into a nuanced and polemical vision of the present. Semiotext(e) authors include Jean Baudrillard, William S. Burroughs, Paul Virilio, Catherine Breillat, The Invisible Committee, Eileen Myles, Mark von Schlegell, David Wojnarowicz, Abdellah Taïa, Guy Hocquenghem, Félix Guattari, Michelle Tea, Penny Arcade, The Bernadette Corporation, Pierre Clastres, Guy Debord, Michelle Bernstein, Dhoruba Bin Wahid, Christian Marazzi, and Peter Sloterdjik. An anthology, Hatred of Capitalism, was published in 2001 to mark Semiotext(e)'s move to The MIT Press as its distributor. Semiotext(e) is coedited by Sylvère Lotringer, Chris Kraus, and Hedi El Kholti

A Sexual Guide to Oldies on TV

A writer casts an acerbic, queer eye on the greats and the not-so-greats of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

Phenomenology of the End

The changes taking place in our aesthetic and emotional sensibility: a deep mutation in the psychosphere, caused by semio-capitalism.

A Comedy

In a novel capturing an era that seems at once familiar and grotesque, a New York writer lands in Los Angeles in 1994.

Essays and Fictions

Sharp, acerbic, and humorous writings that approach psychoanalysis and celebrity on a first-name basis, with subjects that range from Oprah Winfrey to William Eggleston.

A gleeful grotesquerie and savage satire, featuring Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln and the Devil, along with Civil War dead, deconstructed couture, and gay ghosts.

A clear-eyed critique of collegiate jurisprudence, as the process of administering student protests and sexual-assault complaints rolls along a Möbius strip of shifting legality.

A writer takes on subjects as varied as vomit, Kathy Acker’s wardrobe, and Occupy Oakland, in lyric explorations of illness, health, and the body.

Language and Human Nature

Virno’s meditation on speech as an intrinsically political practice mediating between biological invariants and changing historical determinations.

A reflection on, and an extension of, the ideas laid out seven years ago in The Coming Insurrection.

The third novel in von Schlegell’s System Series, set among the water-rich moons of planet Uranus, during Earth’s full collapse.

Correspondence 1995–1996

The tempestuous email correspondence between Kathy Acker and McKenzie Wark, shimmering with insight, gossip, sex, and cultural commentary.

An argument that under capitalism, debt has become infinite and unpayable, expressing a political relation of subjection and enslavement.

An incantatory catalog of cultural artifacts either lost to time or never realized.

An autobiographical incantation of adolescent shame, religious masturbation, and the salvation embodied in the creative act.

Spheres Volume II: Macrospherology

The second, and longest, volume in Peter Sloterdijk’s celebrated Spheres trilogy, on the world history and philosophy of globalization.

A lyrical account of a childhood spent in a castle disguised as a psychiatric clinic, written by the daughter of Félix Guattari.

An Attainable Utopia

The first translation of Julio Cortázar’s genre-jumping meta-comic/novella, featuring Cortázar himself, Susan Sontag, and Octavio Paz in a race to prevent international bibliocide.

Capitalism and the Production of Subjectivity

An analysis of how capitalism today produces subjectivity like any other “good," and what would allow us to escape its hold.

A tale of ambivalent friendship and obsession with a fashionable drifter named Nicola in the fashionable city named Milan.

A Chronicle of the Years 1977–1984

An analysis of how Mitterand came to power in France and how political power seduced the French Left and became a simulacrum.

The Event, The Book

Never-before-published lectures, Q&As, and squabbles from the conference that introduced French theory into America, with a facsimile of the journal issue that emerged from it.

Sturtevant's Volte-Face

The first book-length monograph on Elaine Sturtevant, who has focused her career on the artistic copy.

Peter Sloterdijk’s essay on Friedrich Nietzsche and the benefits and dangers of narcissistic jubilation.

A memoir and a meditation on individual and class identity, and the forces that keep us locked in political closets.

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