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Engineering

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"Shaping Things is about created objects and the environment, which is to say, it's about everything," writes Bruce Sterling in this addition to the Mediawork Pamphlet series. He adds: "Seen from sufficient distance, this is a small topic."

This ambitious book describes the many ways in which invention affects the environment (here defined broadly to include all forms of interaction between humans and nature). The book starts with nature itself and then leads readers to examine the built environment and then specific technologies in areas such as public health and energy.

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Edited by David Kaiser

Pedagogy and the Practice of Science provides the first sustained examination of how scientists' and engineers' training shapes their research and careers. The wide-ranging essays move pedagogy to the center of science studies, asking where questions of scientists' training should fit into our studies of the history, sociology, and anthropology of science. Chapter authors examine the deep interrelations among training, learning, and research and consider how the form of scientific training affects the content of science.

Science and the Art of War through the Age of Enlightenment

The integration of scientific knowledge and military power began long before the Manhattan Project. In the third century BC, Archimedes was renowned for his research in mechanics and mathematics as well as for his design and coordination of defensive siegecraft for Syracuse during the Second Punic War.

Technical drawings by the architects and engineers of the Renaissance made use of a range of new methods of graphic representation. These drawings—among them Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawings of mechanical devices—have long been studied for their aesthetic qualities and technological ingenuity, but their significance for the architects and engineers themselves is seldom considered. The essays in Picturing Machines 1400-1700 take this alternate perspective and look at how drawing shaped the practice of early modern engineering.

Second International Conference Section I

Rapidly quenched metals are the subject of an increasing research effort, spurred on both by advancements in metal processing techniques that have made commercial utilization of these metals feasible and by the recent discoveries of unique and potentially useful properties of these materials. Among the processes that have been perfected is "splat cooling," in which a liquid metal is cooled by being spread as a thin film against a metal substrate. Other processes involve vacuum evaporation, "sputtering," and chemical deposition.

The advanced model rocketeer will find that this book allows him to predict every aspect of his model's performance. It is a comprehensive and rigorous treatment of the trajectory analysis, aerodynamics, and flight dynamics of model rockets; it contains many original methods and demonstrates a wealth of complex problems that still require solutions in model rocketry.

Theory and Applications

This is the first full exposition in print of a subject in whose development over the past fifteen years the author has been a prime participant. As an approach to the study of mechanical vibrations, statistical energy analysis (SEA) has found new applications and adherents with each passing year. The name SEA was coined to emphasize the essential feature of the approach: "Statistical" indicates that the dynamical systems under study are presumed to be drawn from statistical populations or ensembles in which the distribution of the parameters is known.

Switching theory is concerned with the development of models and techniques for the analysis and synthesis of those circuits in which information is represented in discrete or digital form, as opposed to the analog form in which information is represented in a continuous manner. The application of digital techniques over a wider range of human activities has already profoundly affected modern life, and there is no visible limit to their future utility.

Elements of Neutron Interaction Theory is a first-year textbook for graduate students in nuclear engineering, dealing with the interactions of neutrons, photons, and charged particles with nuclei, atoms, and electrons. The aim of the book is to present, as simply as possible, those aspects of neutron interaction theory which follow directly from conservation laws and elementary quantum mechanics. It is intended to be understood by anyone who has obtained the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in physics, chemistry, or one of the engineering disciplines.

  • Page 5 of 11