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Engineering

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Building a Modern Computer from First Principles

In the early days of computer science, the interactions of hardware, software, compilers, and operating system were simple enough to allow students to see an overall picture of how computers worked. With the increasing complexity of computer technology and the resulting specialization of knowledge, such clarity is often lost. Unlike other texts that cover only one aspect of the field, The Elements of Computing Systems gives students an integrated and rigorous picture of applied computer science, as its comes to play in the construction of a simple yet powerful computer system.

"Shaping Things is about created objects and the environment, which is to say, it's about everything," writes Bruce Sterling in this addition to the Mediawork Pamphlet series. He adds: "Seen from sufficient distance, this is a small topic."

This ambitious book describes the many ways in which invention affects the environment (here defined broadly to include all forms of interaction between humans and nature). The book starts with nature itself and then leads readers to examine the built environment and then specific technologies in areas such as public health and energy.

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Edited by David Kaiser

Pedagogy and the Practice of Science provides the first sustained examination of how scientists' and engineers' training shapes their research and careers. The wide-ranging essays move pedagogy to the center of science studies, asking where questions of scientists' training should fit into our studies of the history, sociology, and anthropology of science. Chapter authors examine the deep interrelations among training, learning, and research and consider how the form of scientific training affects the content of science.

Science and the Art of War through the Age of Enlightenment

The integration of scientific knowledge and military power began long before the Manhattan Project. In the third century BC, Archimedes was renowned for his research in mechanics and mathematics as well as for his design and coordination of defensive siegecraft for Syracuse during the Second Punic War.

Technical drawings by the architects and engineers of the Renaissance made use of a range of new methods of graphic representation. These drawings—among them Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawings of mechanical devices—have long been studied for their aesthetic qualities and technological ingenuity, but their significance for the architects and engineers themselves is seldom considered. The essays in Picturing Machines 1400-1700 take this alternate perspective and look at how drawing shaped the practice of early modern engineering.

Elements of Neutron Interaction Theory is a first-year textbook for graduate students in nuclear engineering, dealing with the interactions of neutrons, photons, and charged particles with nuclei, atoms, and electrons. The aim of the book is to present, as simply as possible, those aspects of neutron interaction theory which follow directly from conservation laws and elementary quantum mechanics. It is intended to be understood by anyone who has obtained the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in physics, chemistry, or one of the engineering disciplines.

"Nature designs everything from atoms; hence, we should be able to create any feasible kind of material and device with foresight, if we understood the Periodic System in all its implications. Yet—like weather forecasters—we find ourselves still members of the gambling profession." This was the tenor of the third summer session on modern materials research sponsored by the Laboratory for Insulation Research at MIT in 1963. Its program—organized by Arthur R.

The national interest in large radio and radar telescope systems spans the entire engineering and scientific community, and there is every indication that the country will embark upon the construction of still more of these systesm in the near future. Radio and radar astronomers now require very large mechanical devices. The system specifications lead to structural criteria which are unique and outside the immediate interest and/or capability of most of the structures community.

Second International Conference Section I

Rapidly quenched metals are the subject of an increasing research effort, spurred on both by advancements in metal processing techniques that have made commercial utilization of these metals feasible and by the recent discoveries of unique and potentially useful properties of these materials. Among the processes that have been perfected is "splat cooling," in which a liquid metal is cooled by being spread as a thin film against a metal substrate. Other processes involve vacuum evaporation, "sputtering," and chemical deposition.

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