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MIT Press Open

Donate to the MIT Press to support open access publishing

“Free” is still a rare practice in academic book publishing, and the MIT Press, with its strong public service orientation, is a leader in thinking about and experimenting with the commercial feasibility of various approaches to open access. - Eric von Hippel (T. Wilson (1953) Professor of Technological Innovation at the MIT Sloan School of Management) in his 2016 book Free Innovation.

 

The MIT Press has been a leader in open access book publishing for two decades, beginning in 1995 with the publication of William Mitchell's City of Bits, which appeared simultaneously in print and in a dynamic, open web edition. We support a variety of open access funding models for select books, including monographs, trade books, and textbooks.

The MIT Press journals division also has a long-standing commitment to open access and makes hundreds of articles free on its website mitpressjournals.org.

 

All MIT Press subscription journals support author-paid open access (the “hybrid” model). Including three Gold OA journals launching this year, the Press publishes several completely open access journals: Computational LinguisticsAsian Development ReviewOpen Mind: Discoveries in Cognitive ScienceComputational Psychiatry, and Network Neuroscience.

To view our OA book titles, please scroll through the following webpages or click here for a complete list.

Paola Merlo, Editor-in-Chief 

Computational Linguistics is the longest-running publication devoted exclusively to the design and analysis of natural language processing systems. From this highly-regarded quarterly, university and industry linguists, computational linguists, artificial intelligence investigators, cognitive scientists, speech specialists, and philosophers get information about computational aspects of research on language, linguistics, and the psychology of language processing and performance. The journal is published by the MIT Press on behalf of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL). Computational Linguistics is Open Access.

Peter Dayan and Read Montague, Editors

Computational Psychiatry publishes original research articles and reviews that involve the application, analysis, or invention of theoretical, computational and statistical approaches to mental function and dysfunction. Topics include brain modeling over multiple scales and levels of analysis, and the use of these models to understand psychiatric dysfunction, its remediation, and the sustenance of healthy cognition through the lifespan. The journal also has a special interest in computational issues pertaining to related areas such as law and education.

Computational Psychiatry is an Open Access journal.

Launched in early 2016, the Journal of Design and Science (JoDS) captures the antidisciplinary ethos of the MIT Media Lab. Like the Lab, it opens new connections between science and design, encouraging discourse that breaks down the barriers between traditional academic disciplines. It explores not only the design of science, but also the science of design.

 

Olaf Sporns, Editor

Network Neuroscience features innovative scientific work that significantly advances our understanding of network organization and function in the brain across all scales, from molecules and neurons to circuits and systems. Positioned at the intersection of brain and network sciences, the journal covers empirical and computational studies that record, analyze or model relational data among elements of neurobiological systems, including neuronal signaling and information flow in circuits, patterns of functional connectivity recorded with electrophysiological or imaging methodology, studies of anatomical connections among neurons and brain regions, and interactions among biomolecules or genes.

Discoveries in Cognitive Science

Richard N. Aslin, Editor

Open Mind provides a new venue for the highest quality, most innovative work in cognitive science, offering affordable open access publishing, concise and accessible articles, and quick turnaround times for authors. The journal covers the broad array of content areas within cognitive science using approaches from cognitive psychology, computer science and mathematical psychology, cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology, comparative psychology and behavioral anthropology, decision sciences, and theoretical and experimental linguistics.

Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has endured in the popular imagination for two hundred years. Begun as a ghost story by an intellectually and socially precocious eighteen-year-old author during a cold and rainy summer on the shores of Lake Geneva, the dramatic tale of Victor Frankenstein and his stitched-together creature can be read as the ultimate parable of scientific hubris. Victor, “the modern Prometheus,” tried to do what he perhaps should have left to Nature: create life.

Mastering Complexity

In this book, Sanjoy Mahajan shows us that the way to master complexity is through insight rather than precision. Precision can overwhelm us with information, whereas insight connects seemingly disparate pieces of information into a simple picture. Unlike computers, humans depend on insight. Based on the author’s fifteen years of teaching at MIT, Cambridge University, and Olin College, The Art of Insight in Science and Engineering shows us how to build insight and find understanding, giving readers tools to help them solve any problem in science and engineering.

Category theory was invented in the 1940s to unify and synthesize different areas in mathematics, and it has proven remarkably successful in enabling powerful communication between disparate fields and subfields within mathematics. This book shows that category theory can be useful outside of mathematics as a rigorous, flexible, and coherent modeling language throughout the sciences.

The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving

In problem solving, as in street fighting, rules are for fools: do whatever works—don’t just stand there! Yet we often fear an unjustified leap even though it may land us on a correct result. Traditional mathematics teaching is largely about solving exactly stated problems exactly, yet life often hands us partly defined problems needing only moderately accurate solutions. This engaging book is an antidote to the rigor mortis brought on by too much mathematical rigor, teaching us how to guess answers without needing a proof or an exact calculation.