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Spotlight on Science: Alan Dorin

Spotlight on Science: Alan Dorin

For our August 2015 Spotlight on Science post, we talk to Alan Dorin, guest editor of the Summer 2015 issue of Artificial Life—a forthcoming special issue on Artificial Life, Art, Creativity, and Techno-Hybridisation. The issue will be available in mid-August.

Five Minutes with Nathan Altice

Five Minutes with Nathan Altice

Nathan Altice, author of recently published I AM ERROR: The Nintendo Family Computer / Entertainment System Platform discusses his book and the legacy of Satoru Iwata.

Five Minutes with Brian Obach

Five Minutes with Brian Obach

The latest from our Five Minutes with the author features Brian Obach’s Organic Struggle: The Movement for Sustainable Agriculture in the United States.

Keys Under Doormats Security Report

Keys Under Doormats Security Report

Susan Landau and Whitfield Diffie, along with other security experts and computer scientists, participated in a cryptology study that was published as an MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report this week: “Keys Under Doormats: Mandating Insecurity by Requiring Government Access to all Data and Communications.”

Spotlight on Science: Deena Skolnick Weisberg

Spotlight on Science: Deena Skolnick Weisberg

We are pleased to present Spotlight on Science (SOS), a Q&A series devoted to our science journals. Each month, we will interview the authors of our new, upcoming, and classic science articles and share the Q&A here on the MIT Press blog. We will also ungate each month’s featured science article so that it’s free for all to read for the month. The free articles will be posted on our SOS page.

In memoriam: Hermann Zapf (1918-2015)

In memoriam: Hermann Zapf (1918-2015)

Few who daily read the printed word ever consider how those component letters came to be. Yet every single letter of our alphabet has been shaped by the constant effort to render its image suitable in purpose and beautiful in form. It is not only the designer of a type face who creates the form of its letters: many hands join in the common task to find the final and the best adaptation of the creative artist’s design. Rarely has there been an activity with consequences so manifold and far-reaching as those of the formation of a printing type. Those engaged in this work have thus incurred a great responsibility; they take satisfaction in knowing that their work may represent one of the most noble and progressive of all human activities.