News

Open Mind

Open Mind

As our open access program grows, we check in with Dr. Richard Aslin, Director of the Rochester Center for Brain Imaging. Dr. Aslin is at the helm of the forthcoming OA journal Open Mind: Discoveries in Cognitive Science, which will launch in 2016.

Holiday Throwdown

Holiday Throwdown

It is holiday time again. Yes. Holiday time. As ever, your friends here at the MIT Press are working tirelessly to find fun ways to remind you of our wares, new ones and those from the distant (or not so distant) past. And we want to give you the chance to be winners, too!

Spotlight on Science: Lindsay R. Craig

Spotlight on Science: Lindsay R. Craig

What is evolutionary biology, and how should we talk about it? We interview Lindsay R. Craig (Temple University) about evolutionary development biology (evo-devo), neo-Darwinism, and other terms and frameworks used by scientists and philosophers in this month’s Spotlight on Science Q&A. Craig’s article, “Neo-Darwinism and Evo-Devo: An Argument for Theoretical Pluralism in Evolutionary Biology,” appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of Perspectives on Science.

University Press Week: Design Through the Decades at The MIT Press

University Press Week: Design Through the Decades at The MIT Press

Design has certainly evolved through the decades at The MIT Press. Since so many of our authors are in love with the brain, our designers took one the Press’s most commonly requested cover image—that of quintessential, squishy grey matter—to put our own MIT Press spin on the evolution of design. “The Brain Through the Decades, or Evolution of Design at The MIT Press” illustrates design trends at the Press and showcases some of our most memorable, creative, and influential covers featuring this MIT Press-iconic image.

Five Minutes with Jennifer Doyle

Five Minutes with Jennifer Doyle

Our latest Five minutes with the author features Jennifer Doyle, the author of Campus Sex, Campus Security from Semiotext(e)’s Intervention Series.

Angus Deaton wins the Nobel Prize in Economics

Angus Deaton wins the Nobel Prize in Economics

This week the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences to Angus Deaton “for his analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare.” Last year Professor Deaton and nine other distinguished economists offered their visions of the future in In 100 Years. In the following excerpt from the book, Deaton predicts the future of health.