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Alfons J. Weichenrieder

Alfons J. Weichenrieder is Professor of Economics and Public Finance at the University of Frankfurt and Research Professor at Ifo Institute Munich.

Titles by This Author

Multinational Company Finance and Taxation

The recent increase in cross-border flows of foreign direct investment has sharpened the research focus on multinational taxation. In this book, taxation experts Jack Mintz and Alfons Weichenrieder examine how multinational corporations use indirect financing structures--organizing themselves into groups with several tiers of ownership--to reduce worldwide taxes. They spell out in detail how different tax policies affect corporations’ choice of financing structures, discussing the issues in both theoretical and empirical terms. Drawing on a unique data set (MiDi) on German multinationals provided by the Deutsche Bundesbank in Frankfurt, Mintz and Weichenrieder confirm the prevalence of indirect financing structures for both outbound and inbound German investment. They find evidence of “treaty shopping” to avoid withholding taxes (using a third country with more favorable tax rates as a conduit through which to route investments) and of “debt shifting.” Mintz and Weichenrieder argue that increasing our knowledge of the tax reasons behind conduit investment will lead to a better understanding of how tax policy can affect macroeconomic flows of capital in the global economy. They review the trade-offs that governments face and discuss policy options, considering not only possible changes to corporate income tax policy but also the potential influence of international cooperation on countries’ domestic tax policy.

Titles by This Editor

The six studies collected in this CESifo volume analyze the sometimes unpredictable effects of public regulation on the labor market. Examining a wide range of policy interventions—from subsidized employment to an increased tax on capital—and using a variety of methodologies to analyze them, these contributions by leading scholars of the European labor market will advance the policy debate over regulation at a time of serious labor market problems in Europe and elsewhere.

The first three chapters of Labor Market Institutions and Public Regulation present empirical findings, comparing the effects of job training and subsidized employment on the Swedish labor market, analyzing the effect of extended unemployment benefits on unemployment duration for older Austrian workers, and examining poor labor market performance in Spain even after policy reforms. The following chapters take a more theoretical approach, applying the analytical tools of theory to policy issues. These three studies examine the general equilibrium repercussions of public support for both basic and higher education, develop an efficiency wage model to analyze mandated severance pay, and compare different kinds of redistribution to low-skill workers financed by an increased tax on capital.