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Elhanan Helpman

Elhanan Helpman is Professor of Economics at Harvard University, the Archie Sherman Chair Professor of International Economic Relations in the Eitan Berglas School of Economics at Tel-Aviv University, and a Fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Titles by This Author

This landmark theoretical book is about the mechanisms by which special interest groups affect policy in modern democracies. Defining a special interest group as any organization that takes action on behalf of an identifiable group of voters, Gene Grossman and Elhanan Helpman ask: How do special interest groups derive their power and influence? What determines the extent to which they are able to affect policy outcomes? What happens when groups with differing objectives compete for influence?

Traditional growth theory emphasizes the incentives for capital accumulation rather than technological progress. Innovation is treated as an exogenous process or a by-product of investment in machinery and equipment. Grossman and Helpman develop a unique approach in which innovation is viewed as a deliberate outgrowth of investments in industrial research by forward-looking, profit-seeking agents.

This sequel to Market Structure and Foreign Trade examines the new international trade's applied side. It provides a compact guide to models of the effects of trade policy in imperfectly competitive markets, as well as an up-to-date survey of existing knowledge, which is extended by the authors' useful interpretations of the results.Elhanan Helpman is Archie Sherman Professor of International Economic Relations at Tel Aviv University. Paul R. Krugman is Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Group of Thirty.

Increasing Returns, Imperfect Competition, and the International Economy

Market Structure and Foreign Trade presents a coherent theory of trade in the presence of market structures other than perfect competition. The theory it develops explains trade patterns, especially of industrial countries, and provides an integration between trade and the role of multinational enterprises.

Titles by This Editor

Edited by Elhanan Helpman

Traditionally, economists have considered the accumulation of conventional inputs such as labor and capital to be the primary force behind economic growth. Now, however, many macroeconomists place technological progress at the center of the growth process. This shift is due to new theoretical developments that allow researchers to link microeconomic aspects of the innovation process with macroeconomic outcomes.Most economists have viewed technological progress as an incremental process. A few have focused on the role of drastic innovations--those that introduce a discontinuity.

As the former Eastern Bloc countries and the developing nations endeavor to modernize their economies, much macroeconomic research in the next decade will involve stabilization and reconstruction.

The effects of a government's budget on society and the political economy are of considerable concern to economists as well as to consumers and taxpayers.