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Jack Dongarra

Titles by This Author

Since its release in summer 1994, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) specification has become a standard for message-passing libraries for parallel computations. There exist more than a dozen implementations on a variety of computing platforms, from the IBM SP-2 supercomputer to PCs running Windows NT.

Volume 1, The MPI Core

Since its release in summer 1994, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) specification has become a standard for message-passing libraries for parallel computations. There exist more than a dozen implementations on a variety of computing platforms, from the IBM SP-2 supercomputer to PCs running Windows NT. The initial MPI Standard, known as MPI-1, has been modified over the last two years. This volume, the definitive reference manual for the latest version of MPI-1, contains a complete specification of the MPI Standard. It is annotated with comments that clarify complicated issues, including why certain design choices were made, how users are intended to use the interface, and how they should construct their version of MPI. The volume also provides many detailed, illustrative programming examples.

A Users' Guide and Tutorial for Network Parallel Computing

Written by the team that developed the software, this tutorial is the definitive resource for scientists, engineers, and other computer users who want to use PVM to increase the flexibility and power of their high-performance computing resources. PVM introduces distributed computing, discusses where and how to get the PVM software, provides an overview of PVM and a tutorial on setting up and running existing programs, and introduces basic programming techniques including putting PVM in existing code. There are program examples and details on how PVM works on UNIX and multiprocessor systems, along with advanced topics (portability, debugging, improving performance) and troubleshooting.

PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) is a software package that enables the computer user to define a networked heterogeneous collection of serial, parallel, and vector computers to function as one large computer. It can be used as stand-alone software or as a foundation for other heterogeneous network software. PVM may be configured to contain various machine architectures, including sequential processors, vector processors, and multicomputers, and it can be ported to new computer architectures that may emerge.