Genomic Citizenship

Genomic Citizenship

The Molecularization of Identity in the Contemporary Middle East

By Ian McGonigle

An anthropological study based on ethnographic work in Israel and Qatar explores the relationship between science, particularly genetics, and national identity.

Overview

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Praise

Open Access

Summary

An anthropological study based on ethnographic work in Israel and Qatar explores the relationship between science, particularly genetics, and national identity.

The open access edition of this book was made possible by generous funding from Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin.

Based on ethnographic work in Israel and Qatar, two small Middle Eastern ethnonations with significant biomedical resources, Genomic Citizenship explores the relationship between science and identity. Ian McGonigle, originally trained as a biochemist, draws on anthropological theory, STS, intellectual history, critical theory, Middle Eastern studies, cultural studies, and critical legal studies. He connects biomedical research on ethnic populations to the political, economic, legal, and historical context of the state; to global trends in genetic medicine; and to the politics of identity in the context of global biomedical research.

Genomic Citizenship is more an anthropology of scientific objects than an anthropology of scientists or an ethnography of the laboratory. McGonigle bases his untraditional project on traditional anthropological methods, including participant observation. Some of the most persuasive data in the book are from public records, legal and historical sources, published scientific papers, institutional reports, websites, and brochures.

McGonigle discusses biological understandings of Jewishness, especially in relation to the intellectual history of Zionism and Jewish political thought, and considers the possibility of a novel application of genetics in assigning Israeli citizenship. He also describes developments in genetic medicine in Qatar and analyzes the Qatari Biobank in the context of Qatari nationalism and state-building projects. Considering possible consequences of findings on the diverse origins of the Qatari population for tribal identities, he argues that the nation cannot be defined as either a purely natural or biological entity. Rather, it is reified, reinscribed, and refracted through genomic research and discourse.

Paperback

$75.00 X ISBN: 9780262542944 220 pp. | 6 in x 9 in 7 figures

Endorsements

  • “A highly original, thought-provoking book. McGonigle's surprising and perceptive comparison of Israel and Qatar sheds light on the relationship of politics and genomics and beautifully demonstrates the importance of genes in creating a shared past in the service of political ends.”

    Shai Lavi

    Van Leer Jerusalem Institute; and Professor of Law, Tel Aviv University

  • “Ian McGonigle's nuanced ethnography acquaints us with the array of genetic research and discourse through which ethnonational identities are imagined in Israel and Qatar. For anyone interested in the mutual constitution of science and peoplehood in the era of genomic citizenship, this fascinating study is a must-read.”

    Yoram Bilu

    Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and Israel Prize Recipient

Funding provided by:
Arcadia Fund

Paperback

$75.00 X ISBN: 9780262542944 220 pp. | 6 in x 9 in 7 figures