Quantum Strangeness

Quantum Strangeness

Wrestling with Bell's Theorem and the Ultimate Nature of Reality

By George S. Greenstein

Foreword by David Kaiser

A physicist's efforts to understand the enigma that is quantum mechanics.
Hardcover $19.95 T £14.99

Overview

Author(s)

Praise

Summary

A physicist's efforts to understand the enigma that is quantum mechanics.

Quantum mechanics is one of the glories of our age. The theory lies at the heart of modern society. Quantum mechanics is one of our most valuable forecasters—a “great predictor.” It has immeasurably altered our conception of the natural world. Its philosophical implications are earthshaking. But quantum mechanics steadfastly refuses to speak of many things; it deals in probabilities rather than giving explicit descriptions. It never explains. Einstein, one of its creators, considered the theory incomplete. Even now, many years after the creation of quantum mechanics, physicists continue to argue about it. Astrophysicist George Greenstein has been both fascinated and confused by quantum mechanics for his entire career. In this book, he describes, engagingly and accessibly, his efforts to understand the enigma that is quantum mechanics.

The fastest route to the insight into the ultimate nature of reality revealed by quantum mechanics, Greenstein writes, is through Bell's Theorem, which concerns reality at the quantum level; and Bell's 1964 discovery drives Greenstein's quest. Greenstein recounts a scientific odyssey that begins with Einstein, continues with Bell, and culminates with today's push to develop an industry of quantum machines. Along the way, he discusses spin, entanglement, experimental metaphysics, and quantum teleportation, often with easy-to-grasp analogies. We have known for decades that the world of the quantum was strange, but, Greenstein says, not until John Bell came along did we know just how strange.

Hardcover

$19.95 T | £14.99 ISBN: 9780262039932 160 pp. | 6 in x 9 in 13 b&w photos, 7 line drawings

Contributors

David Kaiser.

Reviews

  • This is one of the finest books I have read on quantum mechanics: lucid and careful, but also entertaining, honest, and generous. It gets to the core of the matter, exposing the strangeness we perceive withing quantum theory. George Greenstein doesn't pretend to give you the answers, but he does something more valuable: he reveals the right questions.

    Phillip Ball, author of Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You knew About Quantum Physics is Different

  • George Greenstein tried for a long time to develop a clear understanding of why Bell's inequalities are important, and one day he had, as he says, an epiphany. We must thank him for sharing with the reader the long and difficult path that led him to his final clarification.

    Alain Aspect

    Professor at Institut d'Optique Graduate School, Universite Paris-Saclay

Endorsements

  • George Greenstein tried for a long time to develop a clear understanding of why Bell's inequalities are important, and one day he had, as he says, an epiphany. We must thank him for sharing with the reader the long and difficult path that led him to his final clarification.

    Alain Aspect

    Professor at Institut d'Optique Graduate School, Université Paris Saclay.

  • This is one of the finest books I have read on quantum mechanics: lucid, and careful, but also entertaining, honest and generous. It gets to the core of the matter, exposing the strangeness we perceive within quantum theory. George Greenstein doesn't pretend to give you the answers, but he does something more valuable: he reveals the right questions.

    Philip Ball

    author of Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics Is Different.