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Hardcover | $65.00 Short | £44.95 | ISBN: 9780262133760 | 475 pp. | 7 x 9 in | April 2001

Essential Info

  • Table of Contents

Resource Management in Real-Time Systems and Networks


Real-time systems and networks are of increasing importance in many applications, including automated factories, telecommunication systems, defense systems, and space systems. This book introduces the concepts and state-of-the-art research developments of resource management in real-time systems and networks. Unlike other texts in the field, it covers the entire spectrum of issues in resource management, including task scheduling in uniprocessor real-time systems; task scheduling, fault-tolerant task scheduling, and resource reclaiming in multiprocessor real-time systems; conventional task scheduling and object-based task scheduling in distributed real-time systems; message scheduling; QoS routing; dependable communication; multicast communication; and medium access protocols in real-time networks. It provides algorithmic treatments for all of the issues addressed, highlighting the intuition behind each algorithm and giving examples. The book also includes two chapters of case studies.

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“This book fills a gap in present-day literature. It gives a thorough overview of the most relevant issues for the construction of distributed real-time systems. I also like the two case studies that demonstrates the practical relevance of the presented material.”
Dieter K. Hammer, Eindhoven University of Technology (EUT), The Netherlands
“An excellent introduction to the important issue of resource management in real-time systems. This book will be a valuable resource for both graduate students and practicing engineers.”
C.M. Krishna, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
“This book deals with interesting and important research issues and provides a comprehensive understanding of the issues and solutions in real-time systems and networks.”
Arun K. Somani, Nicholas Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University