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Hardcover | $14.75 Short | £11.50 | ISBN: 9780262012256 | 400 pp. | 6 x 9 in | 2 illus.| March 2006
Paperback | Out of Print | ISBN: 9780262511926 | 400 pp. | 6 x 9 in | 2 illus.| March 2006
eBook | $19.95 Short | ISBN: 9780262254434 | 400 pp. | 2 illus.| March 2006

Look Inside

What's the Beef?

The Contested Governance of European Food Safety

About the Editors

Christopher Ansell is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

David Vogel is Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds the Solomon Lee Chair in Business Ethics.

Endorsements

“Food issues are at the heart of ongoing policy debates between Europe and the United States, ranging from whether we should have further agricultural subsidies to whether we should grow and eat genetically modified foods. Yet to date there has been little academic analysis explaining why these debates are often left unresolved, often due to a lack of trust, the role of regulatory scandals, or the importance of food culture. This timely book addresses this gap, and hence is essential for anyone interested in US-European policy analysis.”
Ragnar E. Lofstedt, Professor and Director, King's Centre for Risk Management, Kings College London
“This book assembles contributions by internationally renowned experts on food regulation, a topic of considerable importance. Authoritative and wide-ranging, it will be a key addition to the literature.”
Wyn Grant, Politics & International Studies Department, University of Warwick
“Thanks to a braod array of both highly informative and conceptually sophisticated articles, the editors manage to analyze all the major questions raised by the debate, from trade-related issues, to public/private sector relations, to the cultural dimensions of food regulation, to institutional questions. This will become the ABC of food regulation.”
Kalypso Nicolaidis, University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Oxford