Architectural History Foundation

  • Baths and Bathing in Classical Antiquity

    Baths and Bathing in Classical Antiquity

    Architectural History Foundation

    Enriched by over 500 illustrations, many of them by the author, Baths and Bathing in Classical Antiquity is an important sourcebook for this ancient institution.

    Bathing in antiquity elevates a prosaic function to the level of a civic institution for which there is no counterpart in contemporary culture. Enriched by over 500 illustrations, many of them by the author, Baths and Bathing in Classical Antiquity is an important sourcebook for this ancient institution. Through hundreds of examples, it reviews and analyzes the structure, function, and design of baths, seeking to integrate their architecture with the wider social and cultural custom of bathing, and examining in particular the changes this custom underwent in Late Antiquity and in Byzantine and Islamic cultures.

    Yegul explores the complexities of ancient bathing from several points of view. Sociologically, the baths with their vast appeal for all levels of society - were seen as the epitome of democratic ideals and institutions. Politically, they provided the perfect vehicle of propaganda: their lavish and magnificent interiors reflected the might and prosperity of the Roman empire and the apparent generosity of the emperor himself. Architecturally, baths are at the vanguard in the development of Roman building technology. Some of the earliest uses of concrete as a building material and the most innovative applications of the aesthetics of concrete - bold, curvilinear forms, vaults, and domes involved bath buildings. Because of their status as transition between purely utilitarian structures and the more conservative, traditional forms of public and religious architecture, the baths helped to propagate and make acceptable new ideas and new styles in architecture.

    • Hardcover $70.00
    • Paperback $47.00
  • The Paris of Henri IV

    The Paris of Henri IV

    Architecture and Urbanism

    Architectural History Foundation

    Drawing on previously untapped notarial archives in Paris's Minutier central, Hilary Ballon provides a rich and original account of the crucial period between 1605 and 1610 when Paris was transformed from a medieval city decimated by war and neglect into a modern capital.

    The Louvre, the Place Royale (now the Place des Vosges), the Place and rue Dauphine, the Pont Neuf, and the Hôpital Saint Louis were part of a building program initiated by Henri IV that would be unmatched in Paris for more than two centuries. Drawing on previously untapped notarial archives in Paris's Minutier central, Hilary Ballon provides a rich and original account of the crucial period between 1605 and 1610 when Paris was transformed from a medieval city decimated by war and neglect into a modern capital.Ballon takes up each of the major building projects, showing how Henri IV's vision of Paris was translated into brick and stone. She relates the monarch's urbanism to his broader policy objectives: promoting domestic manufacturing, linking the court and commerce, and establishing Paris as the focal point of a unified French state. Ballon reveals that such works as the Place Royale, the first planned square in Paris, and the Hôpital Saint Louis, built to protect the city from the destabilizing effects of the plague, were the result of an interactive process between architectural form, social forces, and political vision rather than reproductions of an unyielding royal idea. Setting aside the traditional view of the monarch's urbanism as self-glorification, of his monuments and squares as static icons, she sees the buildings in the context of Parisian life, from their designs through construction to their use. Ballon then shifts from a focus on the monuments to representations of Henri IV's Paris in maps, city views, and history books. She argues that the king's building program and centralizing policies initiated the development in France of a variety of topographical arts: among these Jacques Du Breul's 1612 history of Paris was the first to impose the city's topography as its organizing principle.

    • Hardcover $65.00
    • Paperback $37.00
  • Le Corbusier Sketchbooks, 1957-1964, Volume 4

    Architectural History Foundation and Francoise de Franclieu

    This final volume contains the personal reflections, criticisms of other's work, and self-criticisms of Le Corbusier's maturity.

    The publication of Volumes 3 and 4 of the Le Corbusier Sketchbooks brings to completion a major undertaking by the Architectural History Foundation. After more than a decade of searching, the Fondation Le Corbusier found a suitable partner in publication to aid in the practical difficulties of producing the last and most elusive of Le Corbusier's unpublished works. André Wogenscky, President of the Fondation Le Corbusier, has stated that the sketchbooks vividly reproduced in these four volumes "are the most private of Le Corbusier's work, the most spontaneous, perhaps the most significant, encompassing all the others - the work of an entire lifetime." Volume 1, 1914-1948 and Volume 2, 1950-1954 were published in 1981. All the volumes are included in the Architectural History Foundation/MIT Press series. Volume 4 1957-1964 This final volume contains the personal reflections, criticisms of other's work, and self-criticisms of Le Corbusier's maturity. He reassesses many of his works and projects with brutal honesty and his evaluation of Dutch functionalism and American architecture are equally forthright. For all this, however, his creative energies appear undiminished. Drawings reveal the inception of the Philips Pavilion at Brussels, showing an unusual engineering device for the walls; a new art form, the "Electronic Poem," suggested by Le Corbusier for the interior of the pavilion; and the first sketches for his only building in the United States, the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard. Volume 4 closes with sketches of Roquebrune, on the Mediterranean, where Le Corbusier lost his life a year after making them.

    • Hardcover $210.00
  • Le Corbusier Sketchbooks, 1954-1957, Volume 3

    Architectural History Foundation and Francoise de Franclieu

    During these years, Le Corbusier further developed the curving sculptural forms he had already used boldly for the pilgrimage chapel at Ronchamp and for the new city of Chandigarh, the new capital of the Punjab.

    The publication of Volumes 3 and 4 of the Le Corbusier Sketchbooks brings to completion a major undertaking by the Architectural History Foundation. After more than a decade of searching, the Fondation Le Corbusier found a suitable partner in publication to aid in the practical difficulties of producing the last and most elusive of Le Corbusier's unpublished works. André Wogenscky, President of the Fondation Le Corbusier, has stated that the sketchbooks vividly reproduced in these four volumes "are the most private of Le Corbusier's work, the most spontaneous, perhaps the most significant, encompassing all the others - the work of an entire lifetime." Volume 1, 1914-1948 and Volume 2, 1950-1954 were published in 1981. All the volumes are included in the Architectural History Foundation/MIT Press series. Volume 3 1954-1957During these years, Le Corbusier further developed the curving sculptural forms he had already used boldly for the pilgrimage chapel at Ronchamp and for the new city of Chandigarh, the new capital of the Punjab. Various sketchbooks record the finishing touches of Ronchamp and continuing work in the building of Chandigarh. Later sketchbooks show Le Corbusier increasingly integrating painting and sculpture with architecture, and introducing a strong symbolic element into his public buildings - such as the Open Hand at Chandigarh. Sketchbooks in Volume 3 also reveal the architect's experiments with environmental control, the use of rustic materials and strong colors in a villa in India and two villas in Paris that are notably different from the more geometric and mechanistic work of Le Corbusier's earlier years.

    • Hardcover $210.00
  • Le Corbusier Sketchbooks, 1950-1954, Volume 2

    Architectural History Foundation

    "These notebooks are the most private of Le Corbusier's work, the most spontaneous, perhaps the most significant, encompassing all the others–the work of an entire lifetime." –André Wogenscky, President, Fondation Le Corbusier

    This second volume in the series of four Le Corbusier Sketchbooks contains notes and sketches Le Corbusier made in the 1950s, a particularly rich period for him. During that time, he received the commission for Chandigarh—a mandate to create an entirely new capital to house the government of the recently created state of Punjab. The next year, he began working on projects for two villas and the Millowners' Building at Ahmedabad. All ten original notebooks record Le Corbusier's reaction to this exotic and complex culture, his interest in its vernacular architecture, and his preoccupation with environmental control through architectural design. They demonstrate how he converted new experiences into unique and very personal designs. They also record his bitter disappointment at being excluded from work on the United Nations building in New York. These sketchbooks also document the years when Le Corbusier transformed his strict, glass-and-metal International Style into aggressively sculptural forms. Here are the initial drawings for this changing sensibility: the Unité d'habitation at Marseille (1947-1952) and the revolutionary pilgrimage chapel at Ronchamp (1950-1954).

    • Hardcover $210.00
  • Le Corbusier Sketchbooks, 1914-1948, Volume 1

    Architectural History Foundation

    Le Corbusier's buildings and writings are widely considered the most important testimony of twentieth-century architecture. No estimate of the architect's genius can be made without reference to the sketchbooks that he carried with him throughout his life.

    In the sketchbooks Le Corbusier drew what he saw around him and recorded his ideas touching on art, architecture, people, and places—ideas that are poetic, at times whimsical, and often startling. The sketchbooks provide an intimate view of his mind and will give a new dimension to our understanding the great architect.

    When considering a new project, the architect often referred to his notations, even those made years before; and the travel sketchbooks were a perennial source of inspiration as well as a record of his own self-critique. In their revelation of the creative process, the sketchbooks are an important aid to methodological and psychological study. They are remarkable for the powerful immediacy of the drawings. In addition, the details of Le Corbusier's architectural production are of enormous historical value. Le Corbusier carefully preserved these documents and selected a special group of them for publication.

    • Hardcover $210.00

Contributor

  • Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House

    The Clients' Report

    Paul R. Hanna and Jean S. Hanna

    This large-format, generously illustrated book tells the story of Wright's famous hexagonal "Honeycomb House" in Palo Alto, California.

    "You look so well in the bee cells that were made to imprison you in sunlight," Frank Lloyd Wright wrote to his clients, the Hannas in 1937. This large-format, generously illustrated book tells the story of Wright's famous hexagonal "Honeycomb House" in Palo Alto, California. In personal correspondence, drawings, photographs, and original documents, it brings to life the complex interaction between architect and client in building an entirely original and remarkable home.

    • Hardcover $25.00
    • Paperback $12.50