Ekaterina Degot

  • Monday Begins on Saturday

    Monday Begins on Saturday

    Ekaterina Degot and David Riff

    Monday Begins on Saturday is the title of a fantasy novel from the 1960s about a magical research institute in the Soviet Union, written by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. It is also the title of the first edition of Bergen Assembly, a new triennial of contemporary art. The project—which takes the form of an exhibition and this book—imagines a contemporary rewriting of the novel as an archipelago of fictitious research institutes. Through an aggregate narrative of essays, works of fiction, artworks, heterogeneous research materials, and curatorial notes, it delves into the idea that contemporary “artistic research” may be the place where the dialectical materialist magic of Monday Begins on Saturday has its afterlife.

    Contributors Jan Verwoert, Our Literal Speed, Boris Groys, Pavel Pepperstein, Renata Salecl, Benedict Seymour, Konstanze Schmitt, Pelin Tan and Anton Vidokle, Ritwik Ghatak, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Clemens von Wedemeyer, Stephan Dillemuth, Roee Rosen, Christian von Borries, Keti Chukhrov, Josef Dabernig, Olga Chernysheva, Władysław Strzemiński, Carlfriedrich Claus et al.

    • Paperback $45.00

Contributor

  • Moscow Symposium

    Moscow Symposium

    Conceptualism Revisited

    Boris Groys

    Beyond the view that multiple, globally dispersed conceptual art practices provide a heterogeneity of cultural references, Andrei Monastyrski and Collective Actions propose much more: other dimensions altogether, other spatiotemporal politics, other timescales, other understandings of matter, other forms of life—not only as works, but as a basic condition for being able to perceive artworks in the first place. Could it be that the Moscow Conceptualists were so elusive or saturated with the particularities of life in a specific economic and intellectual culture that they precluded integration into a broader art historical narrative? If so, then their simultaneously modest and radical approach to form may present a key to understanding the resilience and flexibility of a more general sphere of global conceptualisms that anticipate, surpass, or even bend around their purported origins in canonical European and American regimes of representation, as well as what we currently understand to be the horizon of artistic practice.

    e-flux journal Series edited by Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle

    Contributors Claire Bishop, Keti Chukhrov, Ekaterina Degot, Jörg Heiser, Terry Smith, Anton Vidokle, and Sarah Wilson

    • Paperback $16.00