Eva Ebersberger

  • Olafur Eliasson

    Olafur Eliasson

    Green light—An artistic workshop

    Daniela Zyman and Eva Ebersberger

    Green light is an act of welcoming, addressed both to those who have fled hardship and instability in their home countries and to the residents of the cities receiving them. Working together in a playful creative process, participants build a modular light and construct a communal environment in which difference is not only accepted but embraced.”–Olafur Eliasson

    Green light is a project initiated by artist Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna. Conceived as a field of production and mutual learning, Green light works with refugees, asylum seekers, migrants, and NGOs to fabricate an unlimited edition of fully functional lamps: geometric, stackable modules made from recyclable materials and fitted with a welcoming green light. Providing fundraising and education opportunities, Green light workshops first took place in Vienna in 2016, and have since been hosted at the Moody Center for the Arts, Houston, and the 57th Venice Biennale.

    Green light expresses itself as both a comment and an active response to the legal and social obstacles refugees and asylum seekers face in accessing education, the labor market, and social life. As a social and artistic experiment, it sets out to explore the possibilities and agency of art and cultural institutions in the face of challenges and potentials posed by migration.

    This publication seeks to question and reflect on the project by providing testimonies, stories, and memories by Green light participants, founders, and organizers, as well as essays by art historians and theorists reflecting on the relationship between culture and migration today.

    Copublished with Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary

    • Hardcover $36.00
  • Ernesto Neto and the Huni Kuin

    Ernesto Neto and the Huni Kuin

    Aru Kuxipa—Sacred Secret

    Daniela Zyman, Eva Ebersberger, and Franziska Sophie Wildförster

    “This is a new story; it is called Aru Kuxipa. It is new, but it is old. Aru Kuxipa to me means our people, the old ones, living together with nature, in balance with our tradition. Aru means secret, sacred. Kuxipa means like a god.” —Txana Bane

    The exhibition "Aru Kuxipa" was conceived by Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto as a personal tribute to the Huni Kuin. Held at TBA21 – Augarten, the show was a vibrant demonstration of ancestral futures, a term that unpacks potentials for creating a future that is also deeply rooted in cultures of tradition. Through multiple exchanges between members of thirty-two Huni Kuin communities in Brazil, this publication brings together threads from anthropology, art, and science that are interwoven, like the movement of a serpent, with essay contributions, oral histories, drawings, and traditional song. Together, they outline the way unique kinships produced within an indigenous cosmo-vision can shape our present moment.

    Copublished with Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna

    Contributors Mila Cataldo, Damian Christinger, James Clifford, Anna Dantes, Fabiano Txana Bane Sales Huni Kuin Kaxinawa, Francesca von Habsburg, Marcelo Piedrafita Iglesias, José Yubē de Lima Kaxinawa, Leopardo Yawa Bane Sales Huni Kuin Kaxinawa, Manoel Dua Busē Vandique Kaxinawa, Ricardo Moebus, Jeremy Narby, Ernesto Neto, Osvaldo Isaka Manduca Mateus Kaxinawa, Tiago Paulino Sales Txana Xiná Bena, Virgulino Ixã Rodrigues Sales Kaxinawa, Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen, Franziska Sophie Wildförster, Daniela Zyman

    • Paperback $49.95