Georg Schöllhammer

  • Ion Grigorescu

    Ion Grigorescu

    Diaries 1970–1975

    Georg Schöllhammer and Andreiana Mihail

    Ion Grigorescu is one of the seminal visual artists of his generation in Eastern Europe. In recent years, his complex body of work has attracted increasing attention in the West, entailing a reading of his oeuvre through the prism of canonized Western art histories. This first English edition of his diaries from the crucial years of 1970 to 1975 is a small literary and art-historical sensation. It not only corrects the facile reading of Grigorescu's practice in the context of Conceptual art and performance, but provides insight into the artist's multifocal thinking, which incorporates an original critique of modernism, the dystopian effects of an instrumentalized idea of reason and rationality, an analysis of subjectivity, and a penetrating gaze into a dialectic of secrecy and elucidation, of exposure and mystification.

    Grigorescu's diaries are written notes revolving around the status of the image, and investigate the relation of the body to society and of art to the world, in a deep phenomenological reconsideration. His work proposes a parallel conception of the public made tangible through the eloquence of the body.

    In poetic language full of powerfully pictorial metaphors, Grigorescu reflects on his observations of the tension between the realistic effects of the image, the suppression of realism, and the hidden traces the gaze holds through the activities of the increasingly present unconscious of collective memory. Along with the drawings, paintings, photographs, and sketches that accompany them, the diaries serve as an introduction that opens up the possibility of conceiving Grigorescu's art as a rare evocation of a singular way of thinking: a stance.

    • Hardcover $29.95
  • Sweet Sixties

    Sweet Sixties

    Specters and Spirits of a Parallel Avant-Garde

    Georg Schöllhammer and Ruben Arevshatyan

    Sweet Sixties is a long-term trans-regional research initiative working between art, research, media, and educational contexts in Europe, the Middle East, western and central Asia, Latin America, and northern Africa. Involving a particular group of experimentally oriented arts and research groups as well as individual artists, researchers, and media, Sweet Sixties investigates hidden histories or underexposed cultural junctions and exchange channels in the revolutionary period of the 1960s.

    In the 1960s, the landscapes and cities of protectorates and former colonies from India to the Maghreb, from the Soviet Republics to the new states in the southern hemisphere were replete with the spirit and forms of modernity, forms that transmogrify and then dissolve into the thin air of the vernacular. The star maps that are used to survey these artificial worlds often serve to navigate the boundaries between private and public domains. The world full of eerie displacements, gestures of the uncanny, and the constellation of the real exists in a plethora of doubled forms. Question marks and meanderings are all part of this picture. Instruments of communication emerge and are locked away before they have a chance to become immaterial, disappear, and corrode in postmodernity.

    The air of the 1960s echoes a spirit of emancipation. And the newly arising art-scapes are interspersed with double agents: diasporas bring their academies; the streams between Soviet, North and South American, Western European, Non-Aligned, etc., are full of interlocutions, hidden pathways, and narratives of trade routes beyond the seemingly stable hegemonies of the blocs.

    The stories and spirits of a parallel avant-garde, whose silhouettes have yet to be found on the walls of the Western canon, are the theme of this publication.

    • Hardcover $34.00

Contributor

  • Adorno, Volume 2

    Adorno, Volume 2

    The Possibility of the Impossible

    Michael Hirsch, Vanessa Joan Müller, and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    Volume II of Adorno: The Possibility of the Impossible documents the exhibition that looks at the connection between contemporary art and Adorno's writings, with the visual arts becoming a central platform for comparison to Adorno's main subjects. The publication illustrates the works exhibited and discusses the relationship between autonomy and sovereignty.

    Artists included are Carl Andre, Samuel Beckett, Martin Boyce, André Cadere, Martin Creed, Thomas Demand, Jason Dodge, Maria Eichhorn, Peter Friedl, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Henrik Plenge Jacobsen, Euan McDonald, John Massey, Jonathan Monk, Sarah Morris, Bruce Nauman, Mathias Poledna, Stephen Prina, Florian Pumhösl, Ad Reinhardt, Gerhard Richter, Markus Schinwald, Andreas Slominski, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Williams, Cerith Wyn Evans.

    • Paperback $26.00