Hannes Loichinger

  • The Name of Philippe Thomas / Philippe Thomas' Name

    The Name of Philippe Thomas / Philippe Thomas' Name

    Elisabeth Lebovici, Valérie Knoll, and Hannes Loichinger

    In the artistic activities of Philippe Thomas (1951–1995), there was a determination to disappear: it was his procedure to transfer his title of author onto his collectors. This was the case when selling an artwork, or whenever the author's credit was needed for a commissioned text, and in the institutional co-operations that Thomas was a participant of. With this strategy Thomas worked against his own historicization, erasing his name from the reigning European and North American art fields and with prescience Thomas “put up obstacles to block his future 'googleability'” (Hanna Magauer). In recent years, the works and writings of the artist, who also acted on behalf of the semi-fictional agency readymades belong to everyone®, again gained greater visibility and as of current are being assigned a place in art history.

    With this book, Elisabeth Lebovici elaborates on Thomas's strategy to cede and fictionalize authorship and suggests a reading of his work that incorporates questions of gender and reproduction, the multiplicity of the subjects involved, and the unbearable disappearance of Thomas (who died of AIDS-related complications), into the process of enunciation. It is Lebovici's suggestion that the performativity of Thomas's work requires two versions at once: “the one where one enters into the fiction and the one where one observes the beauty of the arrangement and the plot at work. The one where one is inside and the one where one contemplates it.”

    Schriftenreihe by Kunsthalle Bern, ed. by Valérie Knoll and Hannes Loichinger

    • Paperback $13.00
  • Ull Hohn

    Ull Hohn

    Foregrounds, Distances

    Hannes Loichinger and Magnus Schaefer

    After his studies at the arts academies in Berlin and Düsseldorf, Ull Hohn (1960–1995) moved to New York to attend the Whitney Independent Study Program in 1987. Engaging with current theoretical debates and cultural issues, his work from the late 1980s and early 1990s frequently invokes questions of gender and homosexuality, as well as their representation. It interrogates the history of painting, traditional notions of virtuosity, the conventions of value and taste inherent to education, and the distinction between high and popular culture.

    Ull Hohn: Foregrounds, Distances aims not only to offer the first comprehensive overview of his work, but also to contribute to a history of painting-based practices, which occupy a marginal place in the established narratives of the art of the 1980s and 1990s.

    Published in collaboration with Galerie Neu and the Estate of Ull Hohn

    Contributors Tom Burr, Thomas Eggerer, Manfred Hermes, Hannes Loichinger, Fionn Meade, Magnus Schaefer, Megan Francis Sullivan, Lanka Tattersall, Alexis Vaillant

    • Hardcover $49.95
  • Dealing with—Some Texts, Images, and Thoughts Related to American Fine Arts, Co.

    Dealing with—Some Texts, Images, and Thoughts Related to American Fine Arts, Co.

    Valérie Knoll, Hannes Loichinger, and Magnus Schäfer

    The New York gallery American Fine Arts, Co.—whose name today is largely synonymous with that of its gallerist, Colin de Land (1955–2003)—represents a gallery practice in which a decided deviation from conventional models overlaps with successful activities within the framework of the art market. Today, American Fine Arts, Co. and de Land figure as uncontested projection screens for the desire for independence from or bohemian resistance against the dictate of the market. Particularly in retrospect, a consistent image of the gallery is not discernible. Faced with the obvious risk of romanticization, it appears all the more important to pursue an understanding of how American Fine Arts, Co. functioned as a gallery.

    This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition “Dealing with—Some Books, Visuals, and Works Related to American Fine Arts, Co.” at Halle für Kunst Lüneburg and Kunstraum of Leuphana University of Lüneburg (May 28–July 7, 2011), which was developed by Valérie Knoll, Hannes Loichinger, Julia Moritz, and Magnus Schäfer.

    Contributors Andrea Fraser, Manfred Hermes, Karl Holmqvist and Tobias Kaspar, Isla Leaver-Yap, Jackie McAllister, James Meyer and Christian Philipp Müller, Magnus Schäfer, Axel John Wieder, Phillip Zach; a conversation between Colin de Land, Josef Strau, and Stephan Dillemuth; and an introduction by Hannes Loichinger and Magnus Schäfer

    • Paperback $22.00
  • Charlotte Moth

    Charlotte Moth

    Bleckede 2009 / Rochechouart 2011

    Valérie Knoll and Hannes Loichinger

    The texts assembled in this book began their formation during Charlotte Moth's residency in Bleckede in 2009. Founded on the basic principle to comment and react on events, images, or situations, different artists, writers, and curators have since then been invited to respond on material chosen by Charlotte Moth. The book collects a selection of those responses that have recently been part of the artist's projects or are yet to become a part of it. Taking these different approaches of collaborative praxis as a starting point, Charlotte Moth conceived this book as a further elaboration of her artistic practice, linking different projects that have been realized since 2009.

    This book is published on the occasion of the exhibition “The Absent Forms” at Halle für Kunst, Lüneburg, from September 4 to October 17, 2010.

    Co-published with Halle für Kunst, Lüneburg

    Contributors Guy Brett, Maeve Conolly, Mathieu Copeland, Olivier Michelon, Charlotte Moth, Sadie Murdoch, Francesco Pedraglio, Alice Peinado; introduction by Hannes Loichinger

    • Paperback $18.00

Contributor

  • Death of an Art Critic / Tod einer Kritikerin

    Death of an Art Critic / Tod einer Kritikerin

    Annika Bender

    “The idea behind Donnerstag was to insist on the difference between good art and bad art. I am aware of how anachronistic that sounds and how quickly it evokes the image of an old critic-pontiff wagging his authoritarian pointer finger. But even that image is founded in a misunderstanding: the caricaturesque exaggeration of the critic's voice as dictatorial. But it's really nothing more than that very voice. And it pronounces a judgment that is not juridical, but ideally worth nothing more than the argument at its core. It's far more authoritarian and antidemocratic to deny a public voice the act of judgment and concede to a postheroically styled art writer nothing more than the task of pointing at something. […] Whoever just leaves it at that has also parted ways with any hope of open rivalry between arguments.” —Annika Bender

    This book is an adaptation of Annika Bender's lecture “Jump! You Fuckers!” which was presented at Kunsthalle Bern in the context of a series on overproduction and ambivalence in contemporary art. Annika Bender was one of the pseudonyms of artists Dominic Osterried and Steffen Zillig, who wrote the blog Donnerstag (now discontinued) under her name. To make the criticism she proposed possible, and make public its conditions and inherent contradictions—as well as articulate the reasons for her disappearance—it proved necessary to confer Bender to the archive.

    Schriftenreihe by Kunsthalle Bern, ed. Valérie Knoll and Hannes Loichinger

    • Paperback $13.00