Mick Wilson

Mick Wilson is an artist, educator, and researcher based in Sweden and Ireland and coeditor of The Curatorial Conundrum: What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice? and How Institutions Think (both published by the MIT Press).

  • Kathrin Böhm

    Kathrin Böhm

    Art on the Scale of Life

    Paul O'Neill and Mick Wilson

    A comprehensive overview of artist Kathrin Böhm's multifaceted, deeply collaborative, and durational practice and networks.

    This volume critically profiles, contextualizes, and theoretically elaborates the unique practice of the UK-based German artist Kathrin Böhm. Combining visual and textual material, it offers an overview of Böhm's exceptional modus operandi that is rooted in a highly original artistic synthesis of a range of practices. Over the last three decades, Böhm has expanded the terms of socially engaged ways of working to an unprecedented scale and breadth by producing complex organizational, spatial, visual, and economic forms. These often entail the production of complex infrastructures, manifested via projects such as Culture is a Verb (2018–21), The Centre for Plausible Economies (2018–ongoing), Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks (2014–ongoing) and the Eco-Nomadic School (2010–ongoing). The book follows a major mid-career exhibition at The Showroom, London, in 2021.

    Offering a significant addition to debates on contemporary art and architecture, social action, and public culture, Kathrin Böhm brings together critical reflections by internationally acclaimed contributors. Spanning a wide range of critical positions and disciplines, these include prominent art theorists such as Dave Beech, Stephen Wright, and Gregory Sholette, and leading curatorial voices such as Elvira Dyangani Ose and Céline Condorelli. Perspectives drawn from radical economic theorist Katherine Gibson and architectural theorist Doina Petrescu complement critical reflections by Mick Wilson and Paul O'Neill. In addition, material derived from Böhm's international networks and projects provides an in-depth impression of the deeply ingrained collaborative and durational nature of her way of working.

    Photographic, diagrammatic, and typographical imagery runs through the book, demonstrating the rich visual and spatial languages embedded in Böhm's work. This visual register of the book is therefore much more than a series of illustrations and acts as a counterpoint to, and extension of, the ideas elaborated in the texts. The book is designed by the innovative design studio An Endless Supply, Bristol, who have previously worked with Böhm on several publications and a website.

    • Paperback $39.00
  • Curating After the Global

    Curating After the Global

    Roadmaps for the Present

    Paul O'Neill, Simon Sheikh, Lucy Steeds, and Mick Wilson

    What it means to be global—or to be local—in the context of artistic, curatorial, and theoretical knowledge and practice.

    In this volume, an international, interdisciplinary group of writers discuss what it means to be global—or to be local—in the context of artistic, curatorial and theoretical knowledge and practice. Continuing the discussion begun in The Curatorial Conundrum (2016) and How Institutions Think (2017), Curating After the Global considers curating and questions of locality, geopolitical change, the reassertion of nation-states, and the violent diminishing of citizen and denizen rights across the globe.

    It has become commonplace to talk of a globalized art world and even to speak of contemporary art as a driver of globalization. This universalization of what art is or can be is often presumed to be at the cost of local traditions and any sense of locality and embeddedness. But need this be the case? The contributors to Curating After the Global explore, among other things, specific curatorial projects that may offer roadmaps for the globalized present; new institutional approaches; and ways of thinking, vocabularies, and strategies for moving forward.

    Contributors include Lotte Arndt, Marwa Arsanios, Athena Athanasiou and Simon Sheikh, María Berríos and Jakob Jakobsen, Qalandar Bux Memon, Ntone Edjabe and David Morris, Liam Gillick, Alison Greene, Yaiza María Hernández Velázquez, Prem Krishnamurthy and Emily Smith, Nkule Mabaso, Morad Montazami, Paul-Emmanuel Odin, Vijay Prashad, Kristin Ross, Grace Samboh, Sumesh Sharma, Joshua Simon, Hajnalka Somogyi, Lucy Steeds, Françoise Vergès

    Copublished with the Center for Curatorial Studies Bard College/Luma Foundation

    • Paperback $39.95
  • How Institutions Think

    How Institutions Think

    Between Contemporary Art and Curatorial Discourse

    Paul O'Neill, Lucy Steeds, and Mick Wilson

    Reflections on how institutions inform art, curatorial, educational, and research practices while they shape the world around us.

    Contemporary art and curatorial work, and the institutions that house them, have often been centers of power, hierarchy, control, value, and discipline. Even the most progressive among them face the dilemma of existing as institutionalized anti-institutions. This anthology–taking its title from Mary Douglas's 1986 book, How Institutions Think–reconsiders the practices, habits, models, and rhetoric of the institution and the anti-institution in contemporary art and curating. Contributors reflect upon how institutions inform art, curatorial, educational, and research practices as much as they shape the world around us. They consider the institution as an object ofienquiry across many disciplines, including political theory, organizational science, and sociology.

    Bringing together an international and multidisciplinary group of writers, How Institutions Think addresses such questions as whether institution building is still possible, feasible, or desirable; if there are emergent institutional models for progressive art and curatorial research practices; and how we can establish ethical principles and build our institutions accordingly. The first part, “Thinking via Institution,” moves from the particular to the general; the second part, “Thinking about Institution,” considers broader questions about the nature of institutional frameworks.

    Contributors includeNataša Petrešin Bachelez, Dave Beech, Mélanie Bouteloup, Nikita Yingqian Cai, Binna Choi and Annette Kraus, Céline Condorelli, Pip Day, Clémentine Deliss, Keller Easterling and Andrea Phillips, Bassam El Baroni, Charles Esche, Patricia Falguières, Patrick D. Flores, Marina Gržinić, Stefano Harney and Fred Moten, Alhena Katsof, Emily Pethick, Sarah Pierce, Moses Serubiri, Simon Sheikh, Mick Wilson

    • Paperback $34.95
  • The Curatorial Conundrum

    The Curatorial Conundrum

    What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice?

    Paul O'Neill, Mick Wilson, and Lucy Steeds

    The future of curatorial practice: how education, research, and institutions can adapt to the expansion of the curatorial field.

    Today curators are sometimes more famous than the artists whose work they curate, and curatorship involves more than choosing objects for an exhibition. The expansion of the curatorial field in recent decades has raised questions about exhibition-making itself and the politics of production, display, and distribution. The Curatorial Conundrum looks at the burgeoning field of curatorship and tries to imagine its future. Indeed, practitioners and theorists consider a variety of futures: the future of curatorial education; the future of curatorial research; the future of curatorial and artistic practice; and the institutions that will make these other futures possible.

    The contributors examine the proliferation of graduate programs in curatorial studies over the last twenty years, and consider what can be taught without giving up what is precisely curatorial, within the ever-expanding parameters of curatorial practice in recent times. They discuss curating as collaborative research, asking what happens when exhibition operates as a mode of research in its own right. They explore curatorial practice as an exercise in questioning the world around us; and they speculate about what it will take to build new, innovative, and progressive curatorial research institutions.

    ContributorsNancy Adajania, Mélanie Bouteloup, Nikita Yingqian Cai, Luis Camnitzer, Eddie Chambers, Zasha Cerizza Colah, Galit Eilat, Liam Gillick, Koyo Kouoh, Miguel A. López, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Paul O'Neill, Tobias Ostrander, João Ribas, Sarah Rifky, Sumesh Sharma, Simon Sheikh, Lucy Steeds, Jeannine Tang, David The, Jelena Vesić & Vladimir Jerić Vlidi, What, How & for Whom/WHW, Mick Wilson, Vivian Ziherl

    Copublished with the Center for Curatorial Studies Bard College/Luma Foundation

    • Paperback $34.95

Contributor

  • What about Activism?

    What about Activism?

    Steven Henry Madoff

    Curators and thinkers about contemporary art consider how to engage audiences in creative forms of protest and advocacy.

    With the global rise of a politics of shock, driven by nationalist and authoritarian regimes, what paths to resistance and sites of sanctuary can cultural institutions offer? In this book, more than twenty of the world's leading curators and thinkers about contemporary art offer powerful case studies from their own work, along with historical and theoretical perspectives, that point the way for cultural producers everywhere to engage audiences in creative forms of protest and advocacy capable of confronting the fierce political challenges of today and tomorrow.

    ContributorsDefne Ayas, Ute Meta Bauer, Nicolas Bourriaud, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Joshua Decter, Clémentine Deliss, Irmgard Emmelhainz, Boris Groys, Hou Hanru, Pi Li, Maria Lind, Steven Henry Madoff, Antonia Majaca, Gabi Ngcobo, Hans Ulricht Obrist, Jack Persekian with Alison Ramer, María Belén Saéz de Ibarra, Terry Smith, Nato Thompson, Mick Wilson, Brian Kuan Wood, Tirdad Zolghadr

    • Paperback $26.00