Nicholas Baume

Nicholas Baume is Chief Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, and the curator of the ICA's Anish Kapoor exhibition. He is the editor of Super Vision (MIT Press, 2006).

  • Anish Kapoor

    Anish Kapoor

    Past, Present, Future

    Nicholas Baume

    The first major American publication on this important contemporary sculptor.

    Anish Kapoor is one of a highly inventive generation of sculptors who emerged in London in the early 1980s. Since then he has created a remarkable body of work that blends a modernist sense of pure materiality with a fascination for the manipulation of form and the perception of space. This book—the first major American publication on Kapoor's work—surveys his work since 1979, with a focus on sculptures and installations made since the early 1990s. With more than ninety color images of these ambitious and complex works, three original essays, an extended interview with Kapoor, and selections from his sketchbooks, this book confirms Anish Kapoor's place as one of the most remarkable sculptors working today. Kapoor's work has evolved into an abstract and perceptually complex elaboration of the sculptural object as at once monumental and evanescent, physical and ethereal—as in his famous Cloud Gate (2004) in Chicago's Millennium Park. The works in Anish Kapoor include such striking works as Past, Present, Future (2006), 1000 Names (1979-1980) and When I Am Pregnant (1992). This book, which accompanies an exhibition at Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art, offers American readers a long-overdue opportunity to consider the extraordinary clarity, subtlety, and power of Kapoor's art.

    • Hardcover $9.95 £7.99
  • Super Vision

    Super Vision

    Nicholas Baume

    Leading contemporary artists, including Bridget Riley, Jeff Koons, Mona Hatoum, Andreas Gursky, and Yoko Ono, explore the ecstatic and the threatening aspects of contemporary visual experience.

    New technology enables super vision—both superhuman visual powers and actual supervision by surveillance. In Super Vision, which accompanies the inaugural exhibit at the new Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, a broad selection of important works in a variety of media expresses both the ecstatic and the threatening aspects of vision and reveals visual experience as a source of both pleasure and fear. These works reflect the digital era's profound shift in the nature of visuality itself—as computer graphics and imaging, digitization, and virtuality have transformed both the nature of representation and our relationship to it. Among the leading contemporary artists exploring the changing nature of contemporary visual experience in Super Vision are Bridget Riley, Anish Kapoor, and Gabriel Orozco, with works that bend, twist, and dissolve space, leaving us unsure of the boundaries between inside and outside, surface and depth, self and others. Other works by artists including Jeff Koons, Julie Mehretu, and Andreas Gursky, express aspects of virtuality—some explicitly, some more subtly—and explore the changes in the way we see and understand two-dimensional images. Vision in the twenty-first century is potentially everywhere, all the time; there is no way to escape it. Works by Sigmar Polke, Yoko Ono, Tony Oursler, Thomas Ruff, and others respond in complex ways to this disembodied and penetrating quality of vision. The many full-color images in Super Vision are accompanied by essays by exhibition curator Nicholas Baume, art historian David Joselit, and media theorist McKenzie Wark. Copublished with the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston.

    • Hardcover $8.75 £6.99
  • Sol LeWitt

    Sol LeWitt

    Incomplete Open Cubes

    Nicholas Baume

    A documentation and critical examination of Sol LeWitt's influential Incomplete Open Cubes.

    With essays by Nicholas Baume, Jonathan Flatley, and Pamela M. Lee. Begun in 1974, Incomplete Open Cubes is a sophisticated and elaborate expression of conceptualist art-making by Sol LeWitt, one of the most influential abstract artists of his generation. No other serial project by LeWitt or his contemporaries embodies with such eloquence so many of the central artistic concerns of the period. Incomplete Open Cubes exemplifies the deployment of a single idea to become, in LeWitt's words, "a machine that makes the art." The work forges a new way of making art in its ambitious use of a serial system that enables a kind of "noncompositional composition." The translation of the same idea into different scales and media is another key aspect of the work. All 122 variations in the series exist in three dimensions, from a set in which each cube is 2 1/2 inches square to the 40 inches square human-scaled versions. There are also entire sets of photographs, drawings, working sketches and notes, and an artist's book.This publication, which accompanies an exhibition of Incomplete Open Cubes, is the first sustained critical examination of this body of work. The book features much previously unpublished material, including working drawings, schematic drawings, and models, in addition to photographs of the installed structures. Copublished with the Wadsworth Atheneum.

    • Paperback $27.00 £18.95