Phyllis Lambert

Phyllis Lambert is founder and director of the Canadian Centre for Architecture.

  • Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal

    Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal

    Phyllis Lambert

    This study focuses on the interrelationships of three key elements of Montréal's urban form: its fortifications; the ownership, distribution, and use of property within its walls; and the nature of its buildings.

    Based on a fifteen-year study of manuscript sources from Europe and North America, Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal focuses on the interrelationships of three key elements of Montréal's urban form: its fortifications; the ownership, distribution, and use of property within its walls; and the nature of its buildings. The first section of the book, Fortifications, traces Montréal's development as one of the most important military and commercial centers of the French colonial network arching from Louisbourg to the Great Lakes and down the Lake Champlain and Ohio corridors. It also discusses the related development of the town's fortifications. Town, the second section, examines how Montréal's diversifying economic activities - many connected with the building, maintenance, and supply of inland military posts -influenced land use and building within the walls. The last section, Buildings, focuses on the urban house, Montréal's principal building type in the eighteenth-century, examining it in its material and social environments: morphology of town and fortifications, distribution of institutional buildings, and formative legal traditions—metropolitan French above all, but later also British and American. The demolition of the walls (1801-1817) that had defined the town blurred town and suburb and augured a new urban form.

    • Paperback $5.75 £4.99

Contributor

  • Architecture and Cubism

    Architecture and Cubism

    Eve Blau and Nancy J. Troy

    A fundamental tenet of the historiography of modern architecture holds that cubism forged a vital link between avant-garde practices in early twentieth-century painting and architecture. This collection of essays, commissioned by the Canadian Centre for Architecture, takes a close look at that widely accepted but little scrutinized belief. In the first historically focused examination of the issue, the volume returns to the original site of cubist art in pre-World War I Europe and proceeds to examine the historical, theoretical, and socio-political relationships between avant-garde practices in painting, architecture, and other cultural forms, including poetry, landscape, and the decorative arts. The essays look at works produced in France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Czechoslovakia during the early decades of the twentieth century. Together, the essays show that although there were many points of intersection—historical, metaphorical, theoretical, and ideological—between cubism and architecture, there was no simple, direct link between them. Most often the connections between cubist painting and modern architecture were construed analogically, by reference to shared formal qualities such as fragmentation, spatial ambiguity, transparency, and multiplicity; or to techniques used in other media such as film, poetry, and photomontage. Cubist space itself remained two-dimensional; with the exception of Le Cobusiers work, it was never translated into the three dimensions of architecture. Cubism's significance for architecture also remained two-dimensional—a method of representing modern spatial experience through the ordering impulses of art. Copublished with the Canadian Centre for Architecture/CentreCanadien d'Architecture.

    • Hardcover $80.00 £65.00
    • Paperback $19.75 £15.99
  • The New Spirit

    The New Spirit

    Modern Architecture in Vancouver, 1938-1963

    Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe

    The first comprehensive study of the acclaimed Modernist architecture of Vancouver.

    The Modernist architecture of the two post-war decades established Vancouver's reputation as a center for progressive design and culture, a city where architects pursued their desire "to make of architecture a great humanistic experience." With an introduction by Adele Freedman discussing Modernism in Canadian architecture as a whole, Rhodri Windsor Liscombe's The New Spirit is the first comprehensive study of the acclaimed Modernist architecture of Vancouver. Modernism in Vancouver had many facets: it was a synthesis of expressions driven by a sense of social responsibility; it emphasized concerns such as economy of form, human uses, relation to site, affordability, and the effective employment of new technology. The author explores 25 years of sophisticated and distinctive architectureal innovation, examining both the conditions that brought this movement about and the forces that led to its decline. Given the eventual debasement of Modernism and the demolition of many of these Vancouver buildings, this account of the ambition of Modernist Canadian architects "to enhance the physical environment for human well-being"—in homes, community centers, libraries and universities, churches, office towers, and apartment buildings—serves as a reminder of how high ideals and a lively architectural culture can shape a better city.

    • Paperback $9.75 £7.99
  • Richard Henriquez

    Richard Henriquez

    Memory Theatre

    Howard Shubert

    This book offers a wide-ranging view of Henriquez's architecture, drawings, sculpture, and construction. Included are essays by Alberto Pérez-Gómez and by Howard Shubert, texts by Henriquez, and a portfolio of photographs by Geoffrey James.

    Throughout a twenty-five-year career marked by numerous awards and successful competition entries, the Canadian architect Richard Henriquez has brought a poetic sensibility to the creation of architecture. This book offers a wide- ranging view of his architecture, drawings, sculpture, and construction. Included are essays by Alberto Pérez-Gómez and by Howard Shubert, texts by Henriquez, and a portfolio of photographs by Geoffrey James. Although Henriquez has worked primarily in Vancouver, the Environmental Sciences building completed in 1991 at Trent University, Peterborough, and current projects in Taiwan are evidence of the increasing international scope of his practice. Distributed for the Canadian Centre for Architecture / Centre Canadien d'Architecture

    • Paperback $20.00 £15.99
  • Parables and Other Allegories

    Parables and Other Allegories

    The Work of Melvin Charney, 1975-1990

    Melvin Charney

    This book documents a body of work that has previously been seen only in isolation, disclosing the concerns of an artist who perceives artistic, social, and political spheres as mutually related and interwoven.

    Essays by Patricia Phillips, Phyllis Lambert, and Robert-Jan van Pelt Melvin Charney is an artist and architect from Montreal whose site-related installations, drawings, collages, and texts have raised questions and stimulated discussion on such topics as the nature of the city and the connections between the built environment and the world of ideas. This richly illustrated book documents a body of work that has previously been seen only in isolation, disclosing the concerns of an artist who perceives artistic, social, and political spheres as mutually related and interwoven. Much of Charney's early work, including Les Maisons de la rue Sherbrooke, A Chicago Construction, and A Toronto Construction, has been purposefully ephemeral. Moving in a different direction, several of his more recent projects, such as the Canadian Tribute to Human Rights and The CCA Garden, are permanent and publicly accessible. Parables and Other Allegories offers a comprehensive historical record of Charney's work. Over 200 illustrations, including 95 color reproductions and 96 duotones, along with Charney's own commentary, provide a critical context for his oeuvre. An introduction by Alessandra, Latour, guest curator of the exhibition, and essays by Patricia C. Phillips and Robert-Jan van Pelt explore various aspects of his projects, among them the roles of collective memory and reiterative narrative as well as the harrowing, shamanic investigations of history and monumental evil in the German Series. An interview by Phyllis Lambert investigates how Charney approaches his work and considers a wide range of issues such as abstraction and representation, the notion of space, and the idea of process as meaning.

    • Paperback $9.75 £7.99
  • Architecture and Its Image

    Architecture and Its Image

    Four Centuries of Architectural Representation

    Eve Blau and Edward Kaufman

    Drawing on an incomparable collection of architectural drawings and prints, photographs, books, and periodicals, Architecture and Its Image explores the idea of serial imagery in architectural representation through works dating from the Renaissance to today. Although drawings and photographs of architecture are often viewed as single images, they are generally produced in series. The most basic of these is the set of drawings that shows a building in plan, elevation, and section. But as Architecture and Its Image reveals, the concept can be extended to other types of architectural representations: theater sets, travel accounts, photographic surveys, pattern books, even the alternative designs submitted for competition. All relate in different ways to their subjects; viewed in series, all reveal underlying principles of organization that can convey new understanding of architectural imagery. Under the headings Architecture in Three Dimensions, Architecture in Place and Time, and Architecture in Process, essays by six scholars use the concept of serial imagery to explore the complex relationship between various types of architectural representations and their subject matter: projective drawings (Robin Evans), 19th-century urban survey photography (Eve Blau), the travel narratives of English architectural "explorers" from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century (Edward Kaufman), festival and theater architecture (William Alexander McClung), architectural publications, competitions, and exhibitions (Helene Lipstadt), and computer graphics (Robert Bruegmann). An accompanying catalog describes 350 examples, drawn from the CCA collections, of work by architects and architectural delineators, photographers, and cartographers. The book is illustrated by over 400 superbly reproduced duotone illustrations and 16 pages of color.

    Architecture and Its Image is a publication of the Centre Canadien d'Architecture/Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal Distributed by The MIT Press.

    • Hardcover $80.00 £65.00
  • Canadian Centre for Architecture

    Buildings and Gardens

    Larry Richards

    To mark the 1989 opening of the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, this book documents the building designed for a unique institution: a museum and study center whose collection of architectural books, prints and drawings, photographs, and archives is one of the finest in the world. The essays and illustrations reveal the potential of a museum of architecture as a statement: about the nature of the works it collects and exhibits; about its role in the life of a culture or a city; about architecture itself. The new CCA is not only a work of architecture but also an addition to the public landscape of one of North America's historic cities. It is also a work of restoration: it incorporates the Shaughnessy House, one of Montreal's distinctive 19th-century graystone buildings. The new building's synthesis of classicism and modernism reflects the influence of history and place as well as the predilections of its architect and consulting architect, Peter Rose and Phyllis Lambert.

    A publication of the Centre Canadien d'Architecture/ Canadian Centre for Architecture. Distributed by The MIT Press.

    • Paperback $22.95
  • Planned Assaults

    The Nofamily House, Love/House, Texas Zero

    Lars Lerup

    In the three house projects drawn and described here, Lars Lerup makes "planned assaults" on both architectural dogma and social convention as they are represented by the single-family house, its site, and its program, real or imaginary.

    Foreword by Phyllis Lambert. Postscript by Peter Eisenman

    • Hardcover $35.00
    • Paperback $19.95