Rirkrit Tiravanija

  • DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY

    DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY

    Nikolaus Hirsch, Antto Melasniemi, Michel Müller, and Rirkrit Tiravanija

    Published in conjunction with the eponymous installation at Art Basel 2015, DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY is an extension of the collaboration between artist Rirkrit Tiravanija, architects Nikolaus Hirsch and Michel Müller, and chef Antto Melasniemi. Designed by Hirsch and Müller as an outdoor shelter, the installation, made of modular bamboo and steel, welcomes visitors to engage in discussions while participating in the convivial atmosphere of shared food. This supplemental publication includes interviews, texts, images, and poems that illuminate the installation's properties of self-sufficiency and how it was conceived as a new component of Tiravanija and Kamin Lertchaiprasert's ongoing project “the land,” a self-sustaining artistic community near Chiang Mai, Thailand. At the end of the festival, the structure will be transported to Thailand and will be the first building block of a new workshop on the land.

    In a continuation of conversations among artists surrounding the land, this book explores urbanization in a post-rural condition, the act of building as a collaborative process, and land as a concept that can exist outside of ownership. A discussion with Hirsch, Tiravanija, Melasniemi, and Jörn Schafaff reflects on the way in which the installation builds on the land's objectives relating to improvisation, collaboration, and the questioning of institutional structures. Also featured in the book are recipes developed by Melasniemi on the occasion of this installation-as-workshop, where the public is invited to participate in the cooking process.

    DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY is a project by Rirkrit Tiravanija, Nikolaus Hirsch, Antto Melasniemi, Michel Müller with Angkrit Ajchariyasophon, Sophie Aschauer, Uthit Atimana, Marc Bättig, Klaus Bollinger, Felix Broecker, Carlotta Brucker, Leonardo Bürgi, Letizia Calori, Jessica Coates, Claireban Coffey, Nico Dockx, Raphael Fellmer, Michael Gass, Philipp Gasser, Matthias Görlich, Manfred Grohmann, Raphaela Grolimund, Philipp Grünewald, Somyot Hananuntasuk, Carl Michael von Hausswolff, Karl Holmqvist, Pierre Huyghe, Duangporn Injan, Dueanthalay Injan, Kosit Juntaratip, Dong Kirativongkamchon, Komol Kongjarern, April Lamm, Paphonsak Laor, Kamin Lertchaiprasert, Daniela Leykam, Suwan Limanee, Glorimarta Linares, Kim Boris Löffler, Hector Madera, Therdsak Mahawongsanant, Violette Maillard, Chus Martinez, Philipp Misselwitz, Kritya Notanon, Tepparit Nuntasakun, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Tommaso Pagnacco, Intha Pankeaw, Philippe Parreno, Robert Peters, Thaiwijit Poengkasemsomboon, Tobias Rehberger, Anastasia Remes, Marion Ritzmann, François Roche, Natalia Rolon, Jirasak Saengpolsith, Heikki Salonen, Jörn Schafaff, Ilka Schön, Thasnai Sethaseree, Hanes Sturzenegger, Superflex, Molly Surno, Achim Vogelsberg, Emmi Wegener, Sasiwimon Wongjarin, Eveline Wüthrich

    ContributorsNikolaus Hirsch, Karl Holmqvist, April Lamm, Antto Melasniemi, Philipp Misselwitz, Michel Müller, Jörn Schafaff, Rirkrit Tiravanija

    • Paperback $14.95

Contributor

  • Practicable

    Practicable

    From Participation to Interaction in Contemporary Art

    Samuel Bianchini and Erik Verhagen

    Critical analyses, case studies, and artist interviews examine works of art that are realized with the physical involvement of the viewer.

    How are we to understand works of art that are realized with the physical involvement of the viewer? A relationship between a work of art and its audience that is rooted in an experience that is both aesthetic and physical? Today, these works often use digital technologies, but artists have created participatory works since the 1950s. In this book, critics, writers, and artists offer diverse perspectives on this kind of “practicable” art that bridges contemplation and use, discussing and documenting a wide variety of works from the last several decades. The contributors consider both works that are technologically mediated and those that are not, as long as they are characterized by a process of reciprocal exchange.

    The book offers a historical frame for practicable works, discussing, among other things, the emergence and influence of cybernetics. It examines art movements and tendencies that incorporate participatory strategies; draws on the perspectives of the humanities and sciences; and investigate performance and exhibition. Finally, it presents case studies of key works by artists including and offers interviews with such leading artists and theoreticians as Claire Bishop, Thomas Hirschhorn, Matt Adams of Blast Theory, Seiko Mikami and Bruno Latour. Numerous illustrations of artists and their works accompany the text.

    Contributors Matt Adams (Blast Theory), Jean-Christophe Bailly, Samuel Bianchini, Claire Bishop, Jean-Louis Boissier, Nicolas Bourriaud, Christophe Charles, Valérie Châtelet, Jean-Pierre Cometti, Sarah Cook, Jordan Crandall, Dominique Cunin, Nathalie Delbard, Anna Dezeuze, Diedrich Diederichsen, Christophe Domino, Larisa Dryansky, Glória Ferreira, Jean-Paul Fourmentraux, Gilles Froger, Masaki Fujihata, Jean Gagnon, Katrin Gattinger, Jochen Gerz, Piero Gilardi, Véronique Goudinoux, Usman Haque, Helen Evans and Heiko Hansen (HeHe), Jeppe Hein, Thomas Hirschhorn, Marion Hohlfeldt, Pierre-Damien Huyghe, Judith Ickowicz, Eric Kluitenberg, Janet Kraynak, Bruno Latour, Christophe Leclercq, Frédérik Lesage, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Peter Lunenfeld, Lawrence Malstaf, Julie Martin, Seiko Mikami, Dominique Moulon, Hiroko Myokam, Ernesto Neto, Mayumi Okura, Eddie Panier, Françoise Parfait, Simon Penny, Daniel Pinkas, Chantal Pontbriand, Emanuele Quinz, Margit Rosen, Alberto Sánchez Balmisa, Frederik Schikowski, Arnd Schneider, Madeline Schwartzman, Luke Skrebowski, Vanessa Theodoropoulou, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Andrea Urlberger, Erik Verhagen, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Renate Wiehager, Catherine Wood, Giovanna Zapperi, Anne Zeitz, David Zerbib

    Edited by Samuel Bianchini and Erik Verhagen with the collaboration of Nathalie Delbard and Larisa Dryansky.

    • Hardcover $55.00 £43.00
  • Utopias

    Utopias

    Richard Noble

    Utopian strategies in contemporary art seen in the context of the histories of utopian thinking and avant-garde art.

    Throughout its diverse manifestations, the utopian entails two related but contradictory elements: the aspiration to a better world, and the acknowledgement that its form may only ever live in our imaginations. Furthermore, we are as haunted by the failures of utopian enterprise as we are inspired by the desire to repair the failed and build the new. Contemporary art reflects this general ambivalence. The utopian impulse informs politically activist and relational art, practices that fuse elements of art, design, and architecture, and collaborative projects aspiring to progressive social or political change. Two other tendencies have emerged in recent art: a looking backward to investigate the utopian elements of previous eras, and the imaginative modeling of alternative worlds as intimations of possibility. This anthology contextualizes these utopian currents in relation to political thought, viewing the utopian as a key term in the artistic lineage of modernity. It illuminates how the exploration of utopian themes in art today contributes to our understanding of contemporary cultures, and the possibilities for shaping their futures.

    Artistis surveyed include Joseph Beuys, Paul Chan, Guy Debord, Jeremy Deller, Liam Gillick, Antony Gormley, Dan Graham, Thomas Hirschhorn, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Bodys Isek Kingelez, Paul McCarthy, Constant A. Nieuwenheuys, Paul Noble, Nils Norman, Philippe Parreno, Pil and Galia Kollectiv, Superflex, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Mark Titchner, Atelier van Lieshout, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Wochenklauser, Carey Young.

    Writers include Theodor Adorno, Jennifer Allen, Catherine Bernard, Ernst Bloch, Yve-Alain Bois, Nicolas Bourriaud, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Alex Farquharson, Hal Foster, Michel Foucault, Alison Green, Fredric Jameson, Rosalind Krauss, Hari Kunzru, Donald Kuspit, Dermis P. Leon, Karl Marx, Jeremy Millar, Thomas More, William Morris, Molly Nesbit, Hans Ulrich Obrist, George Orwell, Jacques Rancière, Stephanie Rosenthal, Beatrix Ru.

    • Paperback $24.95 £16.95
  • Design and Art

    Design and Art

    Alex Coles

    The first anthology to address the rise of the "design-art" phenomenon—the breakdown of boundaries between art and architectural, graphic, or product design begun in the Pop and Minimalist eras.

    This reader in Whitechapel's Documents of Contemporary Art series investigates the interchange between art and design. Since the the Pop and Minimalist eras—as the work of artists ranging from Andy Warhol to Dan Graham demonstrates—the traditional boundaries between art and architectural, graphic, and product design have dissolved in critically significant ways. Design and Art traces the rise of the "design-art" phenomenon through the writings of critics and practitioners active in both fields.The texts include writings by Paul Rand, Hal Foster, Miwon Kwon, and others that set the parameters of the debate; utopian visions, including those of architect Peter Cook and writer Douglas Coupland; project descriptions by artists (among them Tobias Rehberger and Jorge Pardo) juxtaposed with theoretical writings; surveys of group practices by such collectives as N55 and Superflex; and views of the artist as mediator—a role assumed in the past to be the province of the designer—as seen in work by Frederick Kiesler, Ed Ruscha, and others. Finally, a book that doesn't privilege either the art world or the design world but puts them in dialogue with each other.

    Contributors David Bourdon, Peter Cook/Archigram, Douglas Coupland, Kees Dorst, Charles Eames, Experimental Jetset, Vilém Flusser, Hal Foster, Liam Gillick, Dan Graham, Clement Greenberg, Richard Hamilton, Donald Judd, Frederick Kiesler, Miwon Kwon, Maria Lind, M/M, N55, George Nelson, Lucy Orta, Jorge Pardo, Norman Potter, Rick Poynor, Paul Rand, Tobias Rehberger, Ed Ruscha, Joe Scanlan, Mary Anne Staniszewski, Superflex, Manfredo Tafuri, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Paul Virilio, Joep van Lieshout, Andy Warhol, Benjamin Weil, Mark Wigley, Andrea Zittel

    Copublished with Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

    • Paperback $24.95 £16.95
  • Participation

    Participation

    Claire Bishop

    Art that seeks to produce situations in which relations are formed among viewers is placed in historical and theoretical context in key writings by critics and artists.

    The desire to move viewers out of the role of passive observers and into the role of producers is one of the hallmarks of twentieth-century art. This tendency can be found in practices and projects ranging from El Lissitzky's exhibition designs to Allan Kaprow's happenings, from minimalist objects to installation art. More recently, this kind of participatory art has gone so far as to encourage and produce new social relationships. Guy Debord's celebrated argument that capitalism fragments the social bond has become the premise for much relational art seeking to challenge and provide alternatives to the discontents of contemporary life. This publication collects texts that place this artistic development in historical and theoretical context.

    Participation begins with writings that provide a theoretical framework for relational art, with essays by Umberto Eco, Bertolt Brecht, Roland Barthes, Peter Bürger, Jen-Luc Nancy, Edoaurd Glissant, and Félix Guattari, as well as the first translation into English of Jacques Rancière's influential "Problems and Transformations in Critical Art." The book also includes central writings by such artists as Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, Joseph Beuys, Augusto Boal, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Hirschhorn, and Rirkrit Tiravanija. And it features recent critical and curatorial debates, with discussions by Lars Bang Larsen, Nicolas Bourriaud, Hal Foster, and Hans-Ulrich Obrist.

    Copublished with Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

    • Paperback $24.95 £16.95