S. Murray Sherman

S. Murray Sherman is Maurice Goldblatt Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Chicago.

  • Functional Connections of Cortical Areas

    Functional Connections of Cortical Areas

    A New View from the Thalamus

    S. Murray Sherman and R. W. Guillery

    Two leading authorities on thalamocortical connections consider how the neural circuits of the brain relate to our actions and perceptions.

    In this book, two leading authorities on the thalamus and its relationship to cortex build on their earlier findings to arrive at new ways of thinking about how the brain relates to the world, to cognition, and behavior. Based on foundations established earlier in their book Exploring the Thalamus and Its Role in Cortical Function, the authors consider the implications of these ground rules for thalamic inputs, thalamocortical connections, and cortical outputs.

    The authors argue that functional and structural analyses of pathways connecting thalamus and cortex point beyond these to lower centers and through them to the body and the world. Each cortical area depends on the messages linking it to body and world. These messages relate to the way we act and think; each cortical area receives thalamic inputs and has outputs to motor centers. Sherman and Guillery go on to discuss such topics as the role of branching axons that carry motor instructions as well as copies of these motor instructions for relay to cortex under the control of the thalamic gate. This gate allows the thalamus to control the passage of information on the basis of which cortex relates to the rest of the nervous system.

    • Hardcover $45.00 £38.00
  • Exploring the Thalamus and Its Role in Cortical Function, Second Edition

    Exploring the Thalamus and Its Role in Cortical Function, Second Edition

    S. Murray Sherman and R. W. Guillery

    Examines the two-way relationships between the thalamus and the cerebral cortex; with updated material and a new chapter on the link between perception and action.

    The thalamus plays a critical role in perceptual processing, but many questions remain about what thalamic activities contribute to sensory and motor functions. In this book, two pioneers in research on the thalamus examine the close two-way relationships between thalamus and cerebral cortex and look at the distinctive functions of the links between the thalamus and the rest of the brain. Countering the dominant "corticocentric" approach to understanding the cerebral cortex—which does not recognize that all neocortical areas receive important inputs from the thalamus and send outputs to lower motor centers—S. Murray Sherman and R.W. Guillery argue for a reappraisal of the way we think about the cortex and its interactions with the rest of the brain.

    The book defines some of the functional categories critical to understanding thalamic functions, including the distinctions between drivers (pathways that carry messages to the cortex) and modulators (which can change the pattern of transmission) and between first-order and higher-order thalamic relays—the former receiving ascending drivers and the latter receiving cortical drivers. This second edition further develops these distinctions with expanded emphasis throughout the book on the role of the thalamus in cortical function. An important new chapter suggests a structural basis for linking perception and action, supplying supporting evidence for a link often overlooked in current views of perceptual processing.

    • Hardcover $68.00 £55.00
    • Paperback $40.00 £32.00

Contributor

  • The New Visual Neurosciences

    The New Visual Neurosciences

    John S. Werner and Leo M. Chalupa

    A comprehensive review of contemporary research in the vision sciences, reflecting the rapid advances of recent years.

    Visual science is the model system for neuroscience, its findings relevant to all other areas. This essential reference to contemporary visual neuroscience covers the extraordinary range of the field today, from molecules and cell assemblies to systems and therapies. It provides a state-of-the art companion to the earlier book The Visual Neurosciences (MIT Press, 2003). This volume covers the dramatic advances made in the last decade, offering new topics, new authors, and new chapters.

    The New Visual Neurosciences assembles groundbreaking research, written by international authorities. Many of the 112 chapters treat seminal topics not included in the earlier book. These new topics include retinal feature detection; cortical connectomics; new approaches to mid-level vision and spatiotemporal perception; the latest understanding of how multimodal integration contributes to visual perception; new theoretical work on the role of neural oscillations in information processing; and new molecular and genetic techniques for understanding visual system development. An entirely new section covers invertebrate vision, reflecting the importance of this research in understanding fundamental principles of visual processing. Another new section treats translational visual neuroscience, covering recent progress in novel treatment modalities for optic nerve disorders, macular degeneration, and retinal cell replacement. The New Visual Neurosciences is an indispensable reference for students, teachers, researchers, clinicians, and anyone interested in contemporary neuroscience.

    Associate Editors Marie Burns, Joy Geng, Mark Goldman, James Handa, Andrew Ishida, George R. Mangun, Kimberley McAllister, Bruno Olshausen, Gregg Recanzone, Mandyam Srinivasan, W.Martin Usrey, Michael Webster, David Whitney

    Sections Retinal Mechanisms and ProcessesOrganization of Visual PathwaysSubcortical ProcessingProcessing in Primary Visual CortexBrightness and ColorPattern, Surface, and ShapeObjects and ScenesTime, Motion, and DepthEye MovementsCortical Mechanisms of Attention, Cognition, and Multimodal IntegrationInvertebrate VisionTheoretical PerspectivesMolecular and Developmental ProcessesTranslational Visual Neuroscience

    • Hardcover $275.00 £225.00