Taylor Walsh

Taylor Walsh is a PhD candidate at Harvard University and a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, where she is a coorganizer of the retrospective Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts.

  • Bruce Nauman

    Bruce Nauman

    Taylor Walsh

    Essential texts on the work of Bruce Nauman, spanning the five decades of the artist's career.

    This volume collects essential texts on the work of Bruce Nauman (b. 1941), an artist of exceptional range whose work continues to probe the fundamentals of both life and art. These critical writings, scholarly essays, and an interview span five decades of Nauman's career, ranging from the first substantive feature on his work, published in 1967, to a catalog essay from his 2018 retrospective. Written by prominent critics, art historians, and curators, the individual texts consider his work in various media, from photography and artists' books to sculpture, video, and room-scaled installations.

    Taken together, the essays trace the arc of critical reception given to Nauman's work, charting the (somewhat uneven) path to his current eminence as one of our truly indispensable living artists.

    Contributors Kathryn Chiong, Fidel A. Danieli, Isabel Graw, Rosalind Krauss, Janet Kraynak, Pamela M. Lee, John Miller, Robert Pincus-Witten, Joan Simon, Robert Slifkin, Marcia Tucker, Anne M. Wagner, Taylor Walsh, and Jeffrey Weiss

    • Hardcover $50.00 £40.00
    • Paperback $21.95 £17.99

Contributor

  • Louise Lawler

    Louise Lawler

    Helen Molesworth

    Essays and interviews that examine the work of an artist whose witty, poignant, and trenchant photographs investigate the life cycle of art objects.

    Louise Lawler has devoted her art practice to investigating the life cycle of art objects. Her photographs depict art in the collector's home, the museum, the auction house, and the commercial gallery, on loading docks, and in storage closets. Her work offers a sustained meditation on the strategies of display that shape art's reception and distribution. The cumulative effect of Lawler's photographs is a silent insistence that context is the primary shaper of art's meaning. Informed by feminism and institutional critique, Lawler's witty, poignant, and trenchant photos frequently pay attention to a host of overlooked details—almost Freudian slips—that ineffably and tacitly shore up what we conventionally think of as art's “power.”

    This book includes the earliest published text on Lawler's work; an examination of her ephemera (Lawler produced, among other things, matchbooks and paperweights); a rare interview with the artist, conducted by Douglas Crimp; a conversation between George Baker and Andrea Fraser on Lawler's work; and essays by writers including Rosalind Krauss, Rosalyn Deutsche, and Helen Molesworth, the volume's editor. The book traces the changing reception of Lawler's work from early preoccupations with appropriation to later discussions of affect.

    • Hardcover $35.00 £28.00
    • Paperback $24.95 £20.00