Thomas Keenan

  • The Flood of Rights

    The Flood of Rights

    Thomas Keenan, Suhail Malik, and Tirdad Zolghadr

    It is difficult to imagine making claims for human rights without using images. For better or worse, images of protest, evidence, and assertion are the lingua franca of struggles for justice today. And they seem to come in a flood, more and more, day and night. But through which channels does the torrent pass? The Flood of Rights examines the pathways through which these images and ideas circulate—routes that do not merely enable, but actually shape human-rights claims and their conceptual background. What are the technologies and languages that structure the global distribution of humanism and universalism, and how do they leave their mark on these ideas themselves? Which narratives and imageries have proven easier to export and import, and whose interests are at stake in the configurations in question?

    The Flood of Rights draws on a conference of the same name, organized by the LUMA Foundation and Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, which took place in Arles, France, in 2013.

    Copublished with the LUMA Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, New York

    Contributors Amanda Beech, Rony Brauman, David Campbell, Olivia Custer, Rosalyn Deutsche, Thomas Keenan, Eric Kluitenberg, David Levine, Suhail Malik, Sohrab Mohebbi, Sharon Sliwinski, Hito Steyerl, Bernard Stiegler, Tirdad Zolghadr

    • Hardcover $34.00
  • The Human Snapshot

    The Human Snapshot

    18.5 x 26.5 cm

    Thomas Keenan and Tirdad Zolghadr

    The Human Snapshot draws upon a conference of the same name organized by the LUMA Foundation and Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College that took place in Arles, France, in 2011. The conference contributions and subsequent essays examine contemporary forms of humanism and universalism as they circulate and are produced in art and photography. The look toward these two terms stems from theorist Ariella Azoulay's research on the seminal exhibition “The Family of Man,” first installed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1955, which she frames as a lens through which to view universalism at play. These values have been under conceptual assault in recent years, yet they continue to proliferate—even through the visual arts, where humanism and universalism are customarily dismissed. The Human Snapshot takes these themes and wrestles with their application in the use of photography, the exhibition format, contemporary democracy, human rights discourse, and the power of the image at large.

    Copublished by the LUMA Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (CCS Bard)

    Contributors Ariella Azoulay, Bassam El Baroni, Roger M. Buergel, George Didi-Huberman, Michel Feher, Hal Foster, Anselm Franke, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti, Maja Hoffmann, Denis Hollier, Thomas Keenan, Alex Klein, Suhail Malik, Marion von Osten, Katya Sander, Hito Steyerl, Eyal Weizman, Tirdad Zolghadr

    • Hardcover $47.00

Contributor

  • Sensible Politics

    Sensible Politics

    The Visual Culture of Nongovernmental Activism

    Meg McLagan and Yates McKee

    The interaction of politics and the visual in the activities of nongovernmental activists.

    Political acts are encoded in medial forms—punch holes on a card, images on a live stream, tweets about events unfolding in real time—that have force, shaping people as subjects and forming the contours of what is sensible, legible, and visible. In doing so they define the terms of political possibility and create terrain for political acts.

    Sensible Politics considers the constitutive role played by aesthetic and performative techniques in the staging of claims by nongovernmental activists. Attending to political aesthetics means focusing not on a disembodied image that travels under the concept of art or visual culture, nor on a preformed domain of the political that seeks subsequent expression in media form. Instead it requires bringing the two realms together into the same analytic frame.

    A diverse group of contributors, from art historians, anthropologists, and political theorists to artists, filmmakers, and architects, considers the interaction of politics and the visual in such topics as the political consequences of a photograph taken by an Israeli soldier in a Palestinian house in Ramallah; AIDS activism; images of social suffering in Iran; the “forensic architecture” of claims to truth; and the “Make Poverty History” campaign. Transcending disciplines, they trace a broader image complex whereby politics is brought to visibility through the mediation of specific cultural forms that mix the legal and the visual, the hermeneutic and the technical, the political and the aesthetic. Their contributions offer critical insight into the practices of mediation whereby the political becomes manifest.

    • Hardcover $37.95 £32.00