Valérie Knoll

  • The Name of Philippe Thomas / Philippe Thomas' Name

    The Name of Philippe Thomas / Philippe Thomas' Name

    Elisabeth Lebovici, Valérie Knoll, and Hannes Loichinger

    In the artistic activities of Philippe Thomas (1951–1995), there was a determination to disappear: it was his procedure to transfer his title of author onto his collectors. This was the case when selling an artwork, or whenever the author's credit was needed for a commissioned text, and in the institutional co-operations that Thomas was a participant of. With this strategy Thomas worked against his own historicization, erasing his name from the reigning European and North American art fields and with prescience Thomas “put up obstacles to block his future 'googleability'” (Hanna Magauer). In recent years, the works and writings of the artist, who also acted on behalf of the semi-fictional agency readymades belong to everyone®, again gained greater visibility and as of current are being assigned a place in art history.

    With this book, Elisabeth Lebovici elaborates on Thomas's strategy to cede and fictionalize authorship and suggests a reading of his work that incorporates questions of gender and reproduction, the multiplicity of the subjects involved, and the unbearable disappearance of Thomas (who died of AIDS-related complications), into the process of enunciation. It is Lebovici's suggestion that the performativity of Thomas's work requires two versions at once: “the one where one enters into the fiction and the one where one observes the beauty of the arrangement and the plot at work. The one where one is inside and the one where one contemplates it.”

    Schriftenreihe by Kunsthalle Bern, ed. by Valérie Knoll and Hannes Loichinger

    • Paperback $13.00
  • Art in the Periphery of the Center

    Art in the Periphery of the Center

    Christoph Behnke, Cornelia Kastelan, Valérie Knoll, and Ulf Wuggenig

    Peripheries are profoundly ambiguous regions. While trying to build a relationship with the center, the periphery often finds itself excluded both on a structural and actor-related level, no matter if the center-periphery model is defined in terms of space or along relations of power. However, beyond static perspectives of such struggles, in a dynamic and globalized artistic field increasingly transformed by the digital revolution, temporary mobility attractors deserve our attention.

    This publication attempts to shift practices of thought toward both critical realism and new materialism. It is neither committed to today's wishful thinking regarding horizontalized networks and deterritorialized structures, nor does it fix itself to determinist approaches. In contrast to twentieth-century constructivist approaches and their epistemic fallacies, materialized verticalities and matter-based, infrastructural spaces are brought to the fore.

    This book is the result of four years of collaborative work that focused on topics of affect, the return of history, ecology, and art and its markets in today's power law–based economies. These themes triggered not only the development of new artworks but also gave rise to reflexive discourses and discussions surrounding art theory, philosophy, sociology, and economics. The book contains a visual documentation of a number of group shows—which also included the works of winners of the Daniel Frese Prize—at Agathenburg Castle, Halle für Kunst Lüneburg, Kunstraum of Leuphana University of Lüneburg, and Kunstverein Springhornhof. The contributions by critics, curators, theoreticians, and scientists include essays and in-depth conversations.

    Works by Art Club 2000, Patterson Beckwith, J. St. Bernard, Angela Bulloch, Daniel Buren, Merlin Carpenter, Gordon Castellane, Diego Castro, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Jeremiah Day, Stephan Dillemuth, John Dogg, Maria Eichhorn, Jana Euler, Loretta Fahrenholz, Renée Green, Karl Holmqvist, Gilta Jansen, Monika Jarecka, Tobias Kaspar, Carola Keitel, Jackie McAllister, Josephine Meckseper, Dirk Meinzer, James Meyer, Shana Moulton, nOffice, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Fabian Reimann, Carissa Rodriguez, Megan Francis Sullivan, Katja Staats, Simon Starling, Buffy Summers, Jan Timme, Daniela Töbelmann, Niko Wolf, Amelie von Wulffen, Phillip Zach

    Copublished with Leuphana University of Lüneburg

    Contributors Marie-Luise Angerer, Christoph Behnke, Ana Bogdanović, Larissa Buchholz, Sabeth Buchmann, Kathrin Busch, Bettina von Dziembowski, Daniel Falb, Paul Feigelfeld, Ulrike Gerhardt, Monica Greco, Erich Hörl, Cornelia Kastelan, Stefanie Kleefeld, Valérie Knoll, Roman Kräussl, Susanne Leeb, Hannes Loichinger, Sven Lütticken, Julia Moritz, Volker Pekron, Pierre Pénet, Dieter Roelstraete, Bettina Roggmann, Stefan Römer, Steffen Rudolph, Michael Sanchez, Magnus Schaefer, Stefanie Sembill, Christophe Spaenjers, Paul Stenner, Jeannine Tang, Olav Velthuis, Ulf Wuggenig

    • Paperback $34.00
  • Dealing with—Some Texts, Images, and Thoughts Related to American Fine Arts, Co.

    Dealing with—Some Texts, Images, and Thoughts Related to American Fine Arts, Co.

    Valérie Knoll, Hannes Loichinger, and Magnus Schäfer

    The New York gallery American Fine Arts, Co.—whose name today is largely synonymous with that of its gallerist, Colin de Land (1955–2003)—represents a gallery practice in which a decided deviation from conventional models overlaps with successful activities within the framework of the art market. Today, American Fine Arts, Co. and de Land figure as uncontested projection screens for the desire for independence from or bohemian resistance against the dictate of the market. Particularly in retrospect, a consistent image of the gallery is not discernible. Faced with the obvious risk of romanticization, it appears all the more important to pursue an understanding of how American Fine Arts, Co. functioned as a gallery.

    This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition “Dealing with—Some Books, Visuals, and Works Related to American Fine Arts, Co.” at Halle für Kunst Lüneburg and Kunstraum of Leuphana University of Lüneburg (May 28–July 7, 2011), which was developed by Valérie Knoll, Hannes Loichinger, Julia Moritz, and Magnus Schäfer.

    Contributors Andrea Fraser, Manfred Hermes, Karl Holmqvist and Tobias Kaspar, Isla Leaver-Yap, Jackie McAllister, James Meyer and Christian Philipp Müller, Magnus Schäfer, Axel John Wieder, Phillip Zach; a conversation between Colin de Land, Josef Strau, and Stephan Dillemuth; and an introduction by Hannes Loichinger and Magnus Schäfer

    • Paperback $22.00
  • Charlotte Moth

    Charlotte Moth

    Bleckede 2009 / Rochechouart 2011

    Valérie Knoll and Hannes Loichinger

    The texts assembled in this book began their formation during Charlotte Moth's residency in Bleckede in 2009. Founded on the basic principle to comment and react on events, images, or situations, different artists, writers, and curators have since then been invited to respond on material chosen by Charlotte Moth. The book collects a selection of those responses that have recently been part of the artist's projects or are yet to become a part of it. Taking these different approaches of collaborative praxis as a starting point, Charlotte Moth conceived this book as a further elaboration of her artistic practice, linking different projects that have been realized since 2009.

    This book is published on the occasion of the exhibition “The Absent Forms” at Halle für Kunst, Lüneburg, from September 4 to October 17, 2010.

    Co-published with Halle für Kunst, Lüneburg

    Contributors Guy Brett, Maeve Conolly, Mathieu Copeland, Olivier Michelon, Charlotte Moth, Sadie Murdoch, Francesco Pedraglio, Alice Peinado; introduction by Hannes Loichinger

    • Paperback $18.00