William Lehr

William Lehr is an Associate Research Scholar at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business and Associate Director of the MIT Internet and Telecoms Convergence Consortium.

  • Internet Telephony

    Internet Telephony

    Lee W. McKnight, William Lehr, and David D. Clark

    This book explores issues posed by convergent voice and data networks, and considers future scenarios as Internet telephony continues to alter the communications landscape.

    Internet telephony is the integration and convergence of voice and data networks, services, and applications. The rapidly developing technology can convert analog voice input to digital data, send it over available networked channels, and then convert it back to voice output. Traditional circuit-switching networks such as telephone lines can be used together with packet-switching networks such as the Internet, thereby merging communication modes such as email, voice mail, fax, pager, real-time human speech, and multimedia videoconferencing into a single integrated system. Because Internet telephony allows the interchangeable and seamless use of phones, computers, personal digital assistants, TV cables, wireless, and Web technology, myriad combinations become possible. The transformation of the Internet from a network application using phone lines to a general communications infrastructure through which voice is but one of many data types offered has a wide impact on applications, architectures, networks, economics, public policy, industry structures, regulation, and service providers. This book explores these and other issues, and considers future scenarios as Internet telephony continues to alter the communications landscape.

    Contributors David D. Clark, Daniel Fryxell, William Lehr, Brett Leida, Terrence P. McGarty, Lee W. McKnight, Philip Mutooni, Husham Sharifi, Marc S. Shuster, Marvin Sirbu, David Tennenhouse, Kanchana Wanichkorn, Jonathan Weinberg

    • Hardcover $45.00 £38.00
    • Paperback $40.00 £32.00

Contributor

  • Regulating the Cloud

    Regulating the Cloud

    Policy for Computing Infrastructure

    Christopher S. Yoo and Jean-François Blanchette

    The emergence of the cloud as infrastructure: experts from a range of disciplines consider policy issues including reliability, privacy, consumer protection, national security, and copyright.

    The emergence of cloud computing marks the moment when computing has become, materially and symbolically, infrastructure—a sociotechnical system that is ubiquitous, essential, and foundational. Increasingly integral to the operation of other critical infrastructures, such as transportation, energy, and finance, it functions, in effect, as a meta-infrastructure. As such, the cloud raises a variety of policy and governance issues, among them market regulation, fairness, access, reliability, privacy, national security, and copyright. In this book, experts from a range of disciplines offer their perspectives on these and other concerns.

    The contributors consider such topics as the economic implications of the cloud's shifting of computing resources from ownership to rental; the capacity of regulation to promote reliability while preserving innovation; the applicability of contract theory to enforce service guarantees; the differing approaches to privacy taken by United States and the European Union in the post-Snowden era; the delocalization or geographic dispersal of the archive; and the cloud-based virtual representations of our body in electronic health data.

    Contributors Nicholas Bauch, Jean-François Blanchette, Marjory Blumenthal, Sandra Braman, Jonathan Cave, Lothar Determann, Luciana Duranti, Svitlana Kobzar, William Lehr, David Nimmer, Andrea Renda, Neil Robinson, Helen Rebecca Schindler, Joe Weinman, Christopher S. Yoo

    • Hardcover $19.75 £15.99
    • Paperback $35.00 £28.00