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March 4, 2015
The year was 1968 and Marshall Nirenberg, an unassuming governement scientist working at the National Institutes of Health, had just won the Nobel Prize for cracking the genetic code. Franklin Portugal's The Least Likely Man tells the story of how Nirenberg beat other world-famous scientists in the race to this important discovery. Franklin Portugal discusses his new book and Nirenberg's enduring legacy. Who was Marshall Nirenberg? What was your personal connection to him?
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Today the editors of  Textures of the Anthropocene: Grain Vapor Ray, a four-volume set of writings that examine the era of human-controlled nature from a variety of perspectives, answer questions abou...
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We regret to pass along the sad news of the death of our author Irving Singer, at age 89. Singer was not just a Press author but an MIT figure par excellence, having taught in the MIT Philosophy Depar...
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Today Helen De Cruz and Johan De Smedt answer questions about their new book, A Natural History of Natural Theology: The Cognitive Science of Theology and Philosophy of Religion, which examines the co...
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We’re excited about the mid-February launch of the American Journal of Health Economics (AJHE)! We caught up with Frank Sloan, Editor-in-Chief of AJHE and author of several MIT Press books, to get the...
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