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A Lunch BIT from Artificial Love by Paul Shepheard

A Lunch BIT from Artificial Love by Paul Shepheard

Artificial Love, Paul Shepheard’s highly original book about architecture and machines, was published in 2003 and received much critical acclaim. Liz Bailey provided this wonderful assessment of the book in The Architect’s Journal:

A Lunch BIT from Perplexities of Consciousness by Eric Schwitzgebel

A Lunch BIT from Perplexities of Consciousness by Eric Schwitzgebel

​​​​​​​Early in Perplexities of Consciousness, Eric Schwitzgebel asks a wonderful and deceptively simple question: Do you dream in color or black and white? Think about it for a second before you answer. OK, which is it? And how can you be certain? And if you think you’re sure, consider that prior to the advent of color television, most people reported dreaming in black and white. After it became commonplace, well, you can probably guess what happened. Now how sure are you?

Five Minutes with Mark Balaguer

Five Minutes with Mark Balaguer

Mark Balaguer, author of the newly released book Free Will from the Essential Knowledge series, answers a few questions on this timeless subject.

A Lunch BIT from Borges and Memory by Rodrigo Quian Quiroga

A Lunch BIT from Borges and Memory by Rodrigo Quian Quiroga

Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. In this BIT, Quian Quiroga explores real-life cases that recall Borges’s fictional “Funes the Memorious,” investigating a man who couldn’t forget, and another who could not form new memories.

A Lunch BIT from The Digital Rights Movement by Hector Postigo

A Lunch BIT from The Digital Rights Movement by Hector Postigo

​​​​​​​What began as an assertion of consumer rights to digital content has become something broader: a movement concerned not just with consumers and gadgets but with cultural ownership. In this excerpt from Origins of the Digital Rights Movement: The White Paper and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act: A BIT of The Digital Rights Movement, Hector Postigo examines the evolution of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, showing that citizens’ concerns were largely ignored in the policy process.

A Lunch BIT from The Memory Process edited by Suzanne Nalbantian, Paul M. Matthews, and James L. McClelland

A Lunch BIT from The Memory Process edited by Suzanne Nalbantian, Paul M. Matthews, and James L. McClelland

In this excerpt from Memory in Art: A BIT of the Memory Process edited by Suzanne Nalbantian, Paul M. Matthews and James L. McClelland, David Freedberg, an art historian investigating the neural bases of empathy, draws on recent neuroscientific research to explore one of the great masterpieces of fifteenth-century Flemish painting, Rogier van der Weyden’s Descent from the Cross. Freedberg connects memory to the direct and indirect bodily responses to a work of art.

A Lunch BIT from Racing the Beam by Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost

A Lunch BIT from Racing the Beam by Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost

Before Xbox, Playstation, Wii, and even Nintendo, there was the Atari Video Computer System, known simply as Atari. Gamers of the 1970s and 80s will recall countless hours spent entranced before dots bouncing across their monitors while playing early video games like Breakout and Combat on this pioneering console. In their book, Racing the Beam, the inaugural volume in the MIT Press’s Platform Studies series, Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost investigate game systems’ underlying computing, developing a critical approach that examines the relationship between platforms and creative expression. 

Five Minutes with Raiford Guins

Five Minutes with Raiford Guins

Sweeping history. Grand history. Neatly packaged narratives of greatness and genius inventors. All of these are the stuff of what Walter Benjamin labeled the “epic element in history”, historiography premised upon continuity and stability, and most firmly what Game After is not about. Instead, I map the “slips”, “slides”, “leaps” and “springing” of game objects across their life histories as they pass through different situations that inform their meaning and their value.

A Lunch BIT from The Language of New Media by Lev Manovich

A Lunch BIT from The Language of New Media by Lev Manovich

In the wake of Sunday’s Academy Awards where movies using CGI like Gravity and Frozen were big winners, our lunch bit is “The Illusions” from Lev Manovich’s influential The Language of New Media. In “The Illusions”, Manovich critiqued the shift from traditional cinematography to usage of computers to generate images used in films. According to Manovich, this is important in New Media studies because before the wide spread usage of computers in films, one looked at an image and judged it on its appearance—how real it looked, but with new media the paradigms for judgment of illusions have changed. Here’s what he has to say about the expansion of analysis of this new technology: